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  • Today's episode is with Michinori Shimoji, an Associate Professor of Linguistics at Kyushu University in Japan. He has a PhD from the Australian National University (ANU). He has published extensively on fieldwork-based descriptions of Ryukyuan languages, particularly Irabu Miyako, which is his father's native language. His research focuses on empirical and inductive generalizations of linguistic systems and structures, with a particular emphasis on typological generalizations. With Patrick Heinrich and Shinsho Miyara, he is the editor of the Handbook of the Ryukyuan Languages History, Structure, and Use (2015). He is also the editor of An Introduction to Ryukyuan Languages (2011), along with Thomas Pellard.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Ryukyuan language familyMiyako languageYaeyama languageYonaguni languageAmami languagesPalauan language Michinori's website
  • The second episode of Season 3 is a live show with Hilaria Cruz from the University of Louisville. Hilaria is a native speaker of Chatino, an endangered Zapotecan language, spoken in the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico and by Chatino who have migrated to the Southeastern United states. Hilaria is currently researching the Chatino concepts of the dead in four Eastern Chatino communities. Hilaria and her sister, Emiliana Cruz, have created an orthography for the Chatino language.

    This live show was recorded as part of LingFest, a program of online linguistics events aimed at a general audience, on Saturday, April 24, 2021. Access to the unabridged video live stream is available on the Field Notes Patreon.

    Things mentioned in this episode

    Hilaria's Chatino deposit at AILLA & ELARChatino language familyZacatepec ChatinoTataltepec ChatinoZenzontepec ChatinoTeojomulco ChatinoChatino children's books to purchase & downloadChatino verbs on Wiktionary"Documenting Sign Language Structure and Language Socialization in the San Juan Quiahije Chatino Signing Community" ELAR deposit by Lynn Hou & Kate Mesh"Gesture, Speech and Sign in Chatino Communities" ELAR deposit by Kate MeshHilaria on the Vocal Fries Podcast & Lingthusiasm Podcast
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  • Welcome to Season 3 of Field Notes! Field Notes episodes will now be released monthly. This season will feature one insider linguist each month. If you would like to hear more Field Notes content, you can now support Field Notes on Patreon!

    This special first episode features Professor Nancy Kula studied phonology for her PhD at the University of Leiden. She has an MA in Linguistics from SOAS, University of London, and a BA in Education with African Languages and Linguistics from the University of Zambia. Following her PhD, she held a post-doctoral position in Leiden and at SOAS for three years and now works at the University of Essex since 2007. She has worked on many topics in phonology including tone and intonation and theoretically works on element theory. She is also interested in Language Policy as it applies to education in multilingual contexts and is currently running a project covering Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia. She has published in international linguistics journals, has edited a number of volumes and serves on international editorial boards.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Nancy's profile at The Uni of Essex Bemba languageBantu language familyNancy on Twitter @nancyckula & @bringing_inNancy's work on ResearchGate & academia.eduField Notes Episode 5 with Khairunnisa on Insider Researcher Language Documentation on SasakField Notes Episode 11 with Alex Garcia on Monolingual Fieldwork in The Philippines
  • Today's episode is with Shobhana Chelliah, a Distinguished Research Professor of Linguistics and Associate Dean at the University of North Texas (UNT). Shobhana is a documentary linguist interested in creating descriptions that expand typological discovery, primarily of the Tibeto-Burman languages spoken in Manipur state, India. Her publications include The Grammar of Meithei (Mouton 1997) and the Handbook of Descriptive Linguistic Fieldwork (co-authored with Willem de Reuse, Springer 2010) and the recently-published Springer Brief titled Why Language Documentation Matters. She is also the founding director of the Computational Resource of South Asian Languages Archive.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    FormalismMeitei (Manipuri) language Lamkang languageTibeto-Burman language family Boro–Garo languages Dimasa languageKokborok languageComputational Resource for South Asian Languages (CoRSAL) ArchiveHakha Chin language Shobhana's website

    *Correction: The two Lamkang scholars who visited UNT were Daniel Tholung and Shekarnong Sankhil. This episode referenced Swamy Ksen, who is a Lamkang language expert Shobhana and her team works with in Manipur.

  • This episode marks the Season Two finale with Professor Pius Akumbu, an Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Bamenda, Cameroon, and an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the University of Hamburg. His research focuses on the documentation and description of Grassfields Bantu languages of Cameroon, including his mother tongue, Babanki. Additionally, Pius researches multilingualism in Cameroon as well as language planning and policy in Africa. He is an ELDP grant recipient and a depositor at the Endangered Languages Archive. He is also a member of the KPAAM-CAM project.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Babanki languageMultimedia Documentation of Babanki Ritual Speech (ELAR deposit)KPAAM-CAM projectNjem (Njyem) language Cameroonian Pidgin EnglishELDPFirebird FoundationFoundation For Endangered LanguagesEndangered Language FundPius Akumbu's websiteBabanki literacy classes and community-based language research by Pius Akumbu (2018)Episode 13: Jeff Good on Facilitating Language Documentation in Cameroon

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotesField Notes Support Page
  • This week's episode is with Willem de Reuse. Willem specializes in the description of Native American languages, particularly Siouan and Athabaskan languages. He wrote his Ph.D. dissertation on the Siberian Yupik language. He has published on morphological theory, language contact, and historical phonology and philology. He has taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Iowa, Ball State University, and the University of Arizona. His current position is at The Language Conservancy, and he also is affiliated with The University of North Texas. He is the Review Editor of the International Journal of American Linguistics, and he has written the Handbook Of Descriptive Linguistic Fieldwork (2011) with Shobhana Chelliah. He is currently conducting fieldwork in Arizona working with speakers of Apache.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    The Language ConservancyApache languageNavajo languageLakota languageHopi languageHän Athabaskan languageCentral Siberian Yupik languageSiouan languagesAthabaskan languagesZulu languageThe world's languages in crisis by Michael Krauss (1992)On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity by Ken Hale (1998)

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today's episode is with N. Haʻalilio Solomon, who is an Instructor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa at Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language, where he is also a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Linguistics. Haʻalilio is also a translator for ‘ōlelo Hawaiʻi with Awaiaulu and Hoʻopulapula, and his studies involve language documentation and revitalization, as well as linguistic ideologies and attitudes surrounding ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. He is the author of the forthcoming book chapter Rescuing Maunalua: Shifting Nomenclatures and the Reconfiguration of Space in Hawaii Kai.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    ʻōlelo HawaiʻiKTUH radio station (Haʻalilio's show is on Sundays 3-6 pm HST)Pūnana Leo Hawaiian Cultural Renaissance Mai Loko Mai O ka ‘I‘ini: Proceeding from a Dream by William H. Wilson and Kauanoe KamanaInternational Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC) The Hawaiian Corpus ProjectKaipuleohone Language Archive

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • This week's episode is with Sheena Shah, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Hamburg in Germany. She is currently working on a 2-year project documenting siPhuthi. Sheena has conducted linguistic fieldwork on a number of languages in Southern Africa, including several indigenous click languages. Sheena’s mother tongue is Gujarati and for her Ph.D., she worked with Gujarati diaspora communities in London, Johannesburg, and Singapore.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    siPhuthi languageN/uu languageGujarati languageN/uu readerSheena on Twitter: @DrSheenaShahASPECTS OF TONE AND VOICE IN PHUTHI (Ph.D. Dissertation by Simon Scurr Donnelly)Diversity in Academia on Instagram: @diversityinacademia

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today's episode is with Andrew Harvey and Richard Griscom from Leiden University. Andrew and Richard have just returned from their most recent field trip to Tanzania and in this episode, they discuss their current projects (documenting Gorwaa, Hadza, and Ihanzu) and teamwork in the field.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    What if…? Imagining non-Western perspectives on pragmatic theory and practice by Felix Ameka & Maria Terkourafi Gorwaa languageHadza languageDatooga languageIhanzu languageFirebird FoundationEndangered Languages Documentation Programme Water filterThe Rift Valley Research NetworkThe Gorwaa Noun Phrase: Toward a Description of the Gorwaa Language (Andrew's ELAR deposit)Documentation of Isimjeeg Datooga (Richard's ELAR deposit)Andrew's website Richard's website Andrew on Twitter: @andrewdtharveyRichard's Twitter: @richardgriscom

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today’s episode is with Dorothea Hoffmann, a documentary linguist who has worked in remote parts of Northern Australia with speakers of MalakMalak, Jaminjung, and Kriol. In North America, she has been involved in language revitalization projects for the Acoma, Ute, Stoney Nakoda, Ho-Chunk and Cowlitz tribes, and First Nations. She is affiliated with the University of Oregon as an Honorary Research Associate and also works as a Linguistic Project Manager for The Language Conservancy. In addition to her linguistic research, Dorothea also is one half of the team that runs a venture called 180forward – an eco-tourism and education business based in New Mexico and the Pacific Northwest.

    In this episode, we discuss how as researchers we should be striving not only to help sustain the languages we work with but to go further and aim for regeneration and to help empower and create new speakers. Doro also explains a bit about Dreamtime narratives in MalakMalak, which are traditional creation stories which, among other things, connect speakers to not only their language but also the land.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    MalakMalak language Matngala languageJaminjung language (Ngaliwurru)Kriol languageLanguage in Time and SpaceDorothea’s websiteThe Language ConservancyDreamtimeSpatial Language

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • This week's episode is with Alice Mitchell, a Junior Professor at the Institute for African Studies at the University of Cologne in Germany. Alice holds a BA in German and Linguistics from the University of Oxford, an MA in Language Documentation and Description from SOAS, and a PhD in Linguistics from the University at Buffalo. Her research focuses on the Datooga language of Tanzania, where she has been conducting fieldwork since 2012.

    In this episode, Alice talks us through her work in Tanzania, and her experiences documenting name avoidance and studying children's speech in Datooga.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Ep 16: Remote Fieldwork with Richard T. GriscomGuernésiais languageDatooga languageNilotic language familyAn Introduction to African Languages by Tucker Childsavoidance registersRøde NTG-2 microphoneZoom H4N audio recorderZoom Q8 video recorderME 62 Sennheiser omnidirectional microphoneVoltaic Systems solar panelVarikin ProjectOn communicative competence. . .in the field by Leslie C. Moore

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today's episode is with Mary Walworth from the Max Planck Institute. Mary is co-leader of the Comparative Oceanic Languages (CoOL) Project at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany. She received her MA and PhD from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, where she focused primarily on documenting the understudied languages of French Polynesia. She specializes in the historical relationships of Oceanic languages, examining both direct relatedness and indirect, contact-based linguistic development. She has worked with many communities throughout French Polynesia and Vanuatu.

    In this episode, Mary shares how her experiences parenting in the field influenced her research and her relationship with the community she collaborates with.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Rapa languageEmae language Epi languagesComparative Oceanic Languages (CoOL) ProjectMary on Twitter @mary_walworth

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • This week's episode is with Richard T. Griscom, a post-doctoral researcher at Leiden University. Richard's research focuses on language documentation, fieldwork methodology, and functional-typological linguistic description and theory, with a special emphasis on the languages of East Africa. Over the past five years, he has been working with the Asimjeeg Datooga and the Hadzabe, both endangered minority language communities of northern Tanzania.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Firebird FoundationDatooga languageDocumentation of Isimjeeg Datooga (ELAR deposit)Hadza languageNilotic language familyBantu language familyCushitic language family The Linguistic Geography of Africa (chapter referenced: The Tanzanian Rift Valley Area by Roland Kießling, Maarten Mous, and Derek Nurse)Richard’s website

    Richard’s equipment:

    Camcorders: Panasonic HC-X920, Sony FDR-AX53 with HVL-LEIR1, Panasonic HC-V800, GoPro Hero7Microphones: Shure SM 35 XLR headset, RODE NTG-2 shotgun, Rode NT4 stereo, Audio-Technica AT803b lavalierAudio Recorders: Zoom H4n, Zoom H5 Android smartphones (Techno W4) + RODE smartLav + microphonesAnker solar panel + USB battery chargerAnker power banksEneloop rechargeable Ni-MH batteriesToshiba hard drivesLenovo ThinkpadAnker Bluetooth keyboardUE Bluetooth speakersLaptops: Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon, HP Streamnon-mobile solar systems (similar)Rode wireless system: RX-CAM & TX-XLR

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today's episode is with Hannah Gibson, fellow SOASian and Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Essex. Hannah's research is primarily concerned with linguistic variation, particularly why and how languages change. Much of her work explores the syntax and semantics of the Bantu languages, with a focus on languages spoken in Eastern Africa. She has conducted data collection in Tanzania, Kenya, South Africa and the UK.

    In this episode, Hannah and I discuss her research, what her daily research routine looks like, and why we should think critically about what we mean when we use the term “fieldwork”.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Rangi language siSwati language Bantu languages Swahili language Hannah’s websiteFollow Hannah on Twitter @itsthegibson (where you can find the Swahili word of the day #SWOTD)

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Today's episode is Guillem Belmar, a Linguistics PhD student at UC Santa Barbara. In this episode, we discuss the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on fieldwork. This discussion was inspired by UCSB grad students who have started a group to share and debate online fieldwork, and this post on social media from Guillem, which urged fieldworkers to pause field trip plans in light of the pandemic.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Mixtec language familyCoronavirus ‘could wipe out Brazil’s indigenous people’ (BBC)COVID-19 RESOURCES IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES FROM SOUTHERN MEXICOCOVID-19 info by language (Endangered Languages Project)Language Archives: ELAR, AILLA, PARADISECHarvesting an archival deposit for your linguistics dissertation (ELAR blog post by Jonas Lau)To learn more about how virtual communities can operate as breathing spaces online for minority languages, reach out to Guillem on Twitter @GuillemBelmar or by email: gbelmarviernes@ucsb.edu

    Other things:

    Doing Fieldwork in a Pandemic (crowdsourced Google Doc)Crowdsourced Suggestions for Online Field Methods Classes (Google Doc)

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • Welcome to Season Two! This is the first episode of Season Two on Field Notes. Although we are living in strange times and fieldwork is not currently possible due to the COVID-19, Field Notes will continue publishing weekly episodes this season to share information and experiences from the field which will hopefully benefit our listeners in the future (when fieldwork is possible again). Until then, hang in there, we are all in this together.

    This episode's guest is Jeff Good. Jeff is a professor and chair of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Buffalo in New York. Jeff is a typologist and his research focuses on lesser-documented Batoid languages in the lower Fungom region of Northwest Cameroon. In this episode, Jeff shares how he started working in the lower Fungom region and how he now works with scholars in Cameroon to facilitate language documentation and research from his base in Buffalo.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Jeff's websiteBantoid languages Leggbó language (paper by Jeff Good)KPAAM-CAMZoom Q8 video cameraRode NTG2 microphoneMarantz audio recorderZoom H4n audio recorderTopics in Language Documentation Seminar reading listSaramaccan (Atlantic creole) on WikipediaEpisode 4 with Hugo Cardoso (focusing on creoles)

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.comEmail: fieldnotespod@gmail.comTwitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes
  • This week’s interview is the Season 1 finale with Miroslav Valeš (Technical University of Liberec). In this interview, Miroslav discusses his long and varied fieldwork career, and his experiences working with the Lakhota (USA), Shuar (Ecuador) and A Fala (Spain) communities.

    Content Warning:

    There is some sensitive material discussed in this interview, including traditional practices that some people may find disturbing.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Andalusian Spanish on Wikipedia Fala language on Wikipedia Lakhota language on Wikipedia Shuar language on WikipediaHuambisa language on Wikipedia Achuar language on WikipediaLegend of the Pishtacu (Pishtaco) Community-Driven Documentation and Description of A FalaMiroslav’s publications on academia.eduMiroslav’s profile on ResearchGate

    Season 2 will be announced on the Field Notes website and on social media (Instagram and Twitter): @lingfieldnotes

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.com

    Email: fieldnotespod@gmail.com

    Twitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes

  • Today’s episode is with Alex Garcia (University of Barcelona). Alex works with the Northern Alta Community in the Philippines. In this episode, Alex discusses how he started working with speakers of Nothern Alta, and how he learned Northern Alta in order to conduct monolingual fieldwork.

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Alex's website

    Alex's data on Kratylos

    Alex’s Northern Alta deposit on ELAR

    "Monolingual Fieldwork" Demonstration - Daniel Everett (from LSA)

    Alex's equipment: Zoom H4n audio recorder, Rode NTG2 (shotgun microphone), Rode NT4 (cardioid microphone), Canon Legria HF G25 (video camera), Canon Powershot SX400 (SLR camera), Toshiba Z30 & Toshiba Satellite C55 (laptops)

    Philippine Negrito languages

    Ilocano language

    Tagalog language

    Bontok language

    Casiguran Dumagat Agta

    Kasiguranin language

    Alta on Wikipedia

    Northern Alta on Wikipedia

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.com

    Email: fieldnotespod@gmail.com

    Twitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes

  • Today's episode is part two of our Q&A episode with Vera Ferreira (CIDLeS & ELDP) & Hugo Cardoso (University of Lisbon). In this episode, we discuss questions from listeners such as "How can fieldworkers deal with the often tragic and uncomfortable circumstances in the field?", "How can we reduce our environmental impact in the field?" and "How to deal with difficult recording situations". Just a reminder, the responses to these questions are based on our own experiences in the field and do not necessarily reflect best practice (i.e., your mileage may vary).

    Things mentioned in this episode:

    Hugo's equipment: Marantz audio recorder, Zoom H6, Panasonic HC-VX98 video cameras, Sennheiser lapel microphone (wireless), Rode NT2-A microphone, Rode NTG2 (shotgun mic), Rode NT microphone

    Zoom Q8 video camera & Sony FDR-AX53 4K Ultra HD (Vera's recommendation)

    Clean Tabs for water purification

    Thank you to our listeners who sent in questions, if you have a question about linguistic fieldwork, you can email it to fieldnotespod@gmail.com

    If you would like to hear more about Vera's fieldwork with the Fala (Spain), Minderico (Portugal) and Bavarian (Germany) communities, you can listen to Field Notes episode two. If you would like to learn more about Hugo's work with the Diu and Kerala communities (India) and the Portuguese Burgher community (Eastern Sri Lanka), you can listen to episode four.

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.com

    Email: fieldnotespod@gmail.com

    Twitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes

  • Today's episode is with Vera Ferreira (CIDLeS & ELDP) & Hugo Cardoso (University of Lisbon). In this episode, Martha, Hugo & Vera discuss questions sent in from listeners. Questions include "How can collected data be shared in a meaningful way with communities" and "What do researchers prioritise during their documentation projects?".

    If you would like to hear more about Vera's fieldwork with the Fala (Spain), Minderico (Portugal) and Bavarian (Germany) communities, you can listen to Field Notes episode two. If you would like to learn more about Hugo's work with the Diu and Kerala communities (India) and the Portuguese Burgher community (Eastern Sri Lanka), you can listen to episode four.

    Get in touch:

    Website: https://fieldnotespod.com

    Email: fieldnotespod@gmail.com

    Twitter & Instagram: @lingfieldnotes