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  • "One of the conclusions I've drawn from COVID...in a sense, was that our communications approach was our most important public health intervention" - Sir Ashley Bloomfield, Former Director General Of Health, New Zealand.

    In this episode, Sir Ashley Bloomfield reflects on his humble upbringing and how he approached being a generalist and took on new opportunities. He goes on to explore early experiences as a doctor, and how he picked up on leadership behaviors from others. Sir Ashley Bloomfield goes on to describe what it's like to be at the nexus of public health, public service and politics. He elaborates on the importance of the public service in being a trusted institution and how this was vital to New Zealand's COVID-19 response. Sir Ashley's enlightening insights provide a roadmap for governments around the world to navigate public health crises.In the final segment of our discussion, we zoom in on Sir Ashley's perspective on leadership and communication during a pandemic. He underscores the power of learning from global contexts and how transparency and effective communication build public trust. His emphasis on continuous learning and growth is a testament to his own journey and the lessons he has gleaned from it. This enriching and enlightening conversation with Sir Ashley Bloomfield isn't just a podcast episode—it's a masterclass in leadership in the face of unprecedented challenges.

    Follow Sir Ashley Bloomfield

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    * LinkedIn

    About our guest:

    Sir Ashley Bloomfield trained in medicine at the University of Auckland and specialised in public health medicine. He has 25 years of experience in public policy and health leadership, including at the World Health Organization in Geneva. He was Director-General of Health from June 2018 to July 2022 and led the country’s health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He was appointed a Knights Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit (KNZM) in the 2023 New Year Honours for services to public health and is now a Professor at the University of Auckland's School of Population Health.

    Additional resources mentioned in the podcast

    * Developing Future Public Service Leaders for Aotearoa New Zealand

    * New Zealand’s COVID-19 response saved 20,000 lives - research

    Contact Information: If you have any feedback, questions or if you'd like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]

    Intro and Out Music Attribution: Music by AudioCoffee from Pixabay



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "You have to be somewhat more strategic, you have to identify your sources of power and use those sources of power to influence the people you want to enact whatever it is you are asking of them" - Professor Sara Singer, Director of the HELIO Labs at Stanford Medicine.

    In this episode, Professor Sara Singer reflects on her early experiences of healthcare with her father being a surgeon and starting out in strategy and policy. Professor Singer highlights that the best leaders and managers do a lot of really good listening and delegation and that there is an important distinction between the two concepts, even if they are being expressed by a single person. She goes on to explore the challenges that managers have in working with experts and the potential for parallel hierarchies within organizations. Professor Singer outlines how clinicians should reflect on their sources of power to better influence colleagues to enact the change they are seeking. Next, she discusses the "Army Crew" case, as an example of when a team loses its identity and needs an intervention to improve the team culture and performance. Finally, Professor Singer packages up the well-studied literature on the science of teamwork as a framework for use in the healthcare setting.

    Follow Professor Sara Singer

    * Twitter/X

    * LinkedIn

    About our guest:

    Sara J. Singer, M.B.A., Ph.D., is a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Professor of Organizational Behavior, by courtesy, at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is Associate Director of the Clinical Excellence Research Center in the Department of Medicine and Faculty Director of the Health Leadership, Innovation, and Organizations (HELIO) Labs in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. She is affiliated faculty with the Stanford Department of Health Policy, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Center for Innovation in Global Health, and Woods Institute for the Environment.

    Additional resources mentioned in the podcast

    * Health Leadership, Innovation, and Organizations (HELIO) Labs

    * The Army Crew Team, Harvard Business School Case

    * Leading Frontline Covid-19 Teams: Research-Informed Strategies

    Contact Information: If you have any feedback, questions or if you'd like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]

    Intro and Out Music Attribution: Music by AudioCoffee from Pixabay



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
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  • "In times of hesitancy in the market, leaders lean in, they assert themselves, they flex and they find an opportunity” - Dr Oliver Keown, managing director of Intuitive Ventures.

    In this episode, Dr. Oliver Keown discusses his career journey from a doctor in the UK's National Health Service, to a venture capitalist as Managing Director at Institutive venture fund. Dr Keown highlights how clinicians have important roles to contribute to this space through our training and experiences. He explores the industry of private equity in healthcare and explains the types of attributes that make a successful partner. Dr Keown put forward suggestions for how policymakers can shape the innovation and venture market that could improve its focus on equity.

    Follow Dr Oliver Keown

    * Twitter/X

    * LinkedIn

    About the guest:

    In 2021, Oliver was recognized as a Top 50 Emerging Leader in corporate venture capital and in 2022, selected as #39 on the Global Corporate Venturing Power List of the 100 most influential investors in the industry. Before coming to Intuitive Ventures, Oliver was a healthcare investor with GE Ventures, driving international startup deal flow and supporting numerous portfolio companies operationally and at the board level. Prior to that, he advised an array of UK, US and global healthcare innovation projects across technology, government, commercial, and academic fields.

    Additional resources mentioned in the podcast:

    * Intuitive Ventures

    Contact information: If you have any feedback, questions or if you'd like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]

    Intro and Out Music Attribution: Music by AudioCoffee from Pixabay



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "There's good news, we're actually seeing signs of a virtuous cycle, we're seeing [workforce] pride in organizations and that leads to people working together better, making the care better, which means the patients are more grateful, which makes people feel even more pride".

    — Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief Medical Officer at Press Ganey.

    In this episode, Dr. Thomas H. Lee discusses his professional growth, career development, and the core competencies of healthcare leaders. He distinguishes between leadership and management while highlighting their vital roles within complex health organizations.

    Dr Lee explores clinicians’ important contributions to value creation, and the need to hone in on the "value chain". He further develops the idea that people should have choices when it comes to healthcare and we (healthcare providers) should be working hard to be chosen. Dr. Lee underscored the importance of trust-building with patients and staff alike.

    Follow Dr Thomas H. Lee: Twitter/X, LinkedIn.

    About the guest: Dr. Thomas Lee is the Chief Medical Officer for Press Ganey and an internist/cardiologist who practices at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. He is on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health and is Editor-in-Chief of NEJM Catalyst and a member of the Editorial Board of The New England Journal of Medicine. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Geisinger Health System and chairs the Board of Geisinger Health Plan. Before joining Press Ganey in 2013, he was Network President for Partners Healthcare System.

    Additional resources mentioned in the podcast:

    Book - Healthcare's Path Forward: How Ongoing Crises Are Creating New Standards for Excellence

    Book - HBR's 10 Must Reads On Leadership for Healthcare

    Turning Doctors into Leaders - Harvard Business Review

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "We think as healthcare institutions as just healthcare institutions...actually healthcare institutions are just big businesses that happen to do healthcare, this idea is that there is a whole array of other activities besides healthcare, that have an enormous impact on our local communities"

    — Dr. Laura Gottlieb, Family Physician and Director of SIREN.

    In this episode, Dr Laura Gottlieb explores her early frustrations with providing healthcare in a complex system and how she sought out better tools to arm clinical teams to be successful. Dr Gottlieb then elaborates on the need for more translators of the 'Social Determinants of Health' research, to enable frontline providers and policymakers to know what to do next.

    Spending time in the field has highlighted the ongoing challenges in the complexity of research and how her thinking has evolved over time. Dr Gottlieb outlines the 5 A's framework which illustrates the approaches that providers and communities can take to address underlying social conditions and needs.

    She then explores the concept of the anchor institutions, and how healthcare institutions provide more than just healthcare.

    Follow Dr Laura Gottlieb: Twitter/X, LinkedIn

    About our guest: Dr Gottlieb is a Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research explores healthcare sector programs and policies related to identifying and addressing social risk factors in the context of care delivery. She is the founding co-director of the Social Interventions Research and Evaluation Network, a national research network that advances research on healthcare strategies to improve social conditions. Dr. Gottlieb is also Associate Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evidence for Action National Program Office.

    Resources mentioned in the podcast:

    The Social Interventions Research & Evaluation Network

    Health Care Sector Activities to Improve Social Care and Strengthen Social Resources (The 5 A's)

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "If we had a multitiered, multilayered approach to clinical leadership where we don't just provide about patient care, but we think about improving the processes and tools...and leave a legacy over time then I think we'd have greater success in driving digital change in health"

    — Dr Simon Kos, Healthcare Executive at Microsoft.

    In this episode, Dr Simon Kos explores his journey into digital health, his career reflections and the evolution in the thinking of digital healthcare. He reflects chance life events and educational experiences that allowed him to progress from the Emergency Room into a globally recognised digital health leader.

    Dr Kos highlights many of the challenges in digital health in terms of just digitizing processes versus transforming processes. He describes how with particular digital tools, benefits can accrue at different levels, and as such, it is vital that frontline staff are included in those benefits.

    Finally, he covers key questions that all earlier and mid-career professionals should be considering when looking to the future.

    Follow Dr Simon Kos: LinkedIn

    About the guest: Dr Simon Kos is an internationally recognized leader in digital health, working in senior executive roles for over twenty years. He is a registered medical practitioner who has practised critical care medicine in Australia. He holds an MBBS from UNSW, an MBA from AGSM and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Digital Health (FAIDH). Significant past roles include global Chief Medical Officer of Microsoft based in Seattle, CEO of Next Practice, Physician Executive with Cerner, and the co-chair of the Global Commission to end the Diagnostic Odyssey for children with a Rare Disease. He is currently the Chief Medical Officer at Microsoft ANZ, a mentor in both NHS and Australia’s Clinical Entrepreneur Programs, a casual lecturer at UNSW School of Medicine, a board member of Innowell, and an advisor/investor in digital health start-ups.

    Resources mentioned in the podcast:

    How Simon Kos found his way back to Microsoft

    AI Mythbusting

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "Don't let the fact that you don't know the last step, stop you from acting today.” - Dr. Nick Watts, Chief Sustainbaility Officer, NHS.

    In this episode, Dr Nick Watts discusses what it takes to be part of a world-leading race to zero carbon emissions in healthcare. Dr Watt reflects on his early career at the World Health Organisation and at the Lancet’s Countdown climate organisation.

    He elaborates on approaching climate change with a multidisciplinary team of experts and what was needed to make them successful. Dr Watts then highlights how getting to carbon zero is part of the NHS's core mission and that it’s leadership, workforce and the people it services - are all on board with making the changes. We then critically examine the challenges of coalition-building, emphasizing the need for open communication, relationship-building, and evidence-based solutions. Finally, we navigate the tense balance between the urgency to reduce our carbon footprint and the call for fundamental shifts in our worldview. We explore Dr. Watts' transition to his role at the NHS, probe the importance of effective communication, and discuss the challenge of upscaling with limited resources.

    Get ready to be inspired as we highlight the role of innovation in healthcare sustainability and the power of empowering individuals to take action. All this and more in an enlightening conversation that intertwines climate change, healthcare, and leadership.

    Follow Dr Nick Watts:

    * Twitter/X

    * LinkedIn

    About the guest:

    Dr Watts is the Chief Sustainability Officer for the NHS, responsible for its commitment to deliver the world’s first net zero health service. He’s a medical doctor, a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians’ Faculty of Public Health, and an adjunct professor at the University of Notre Dame and at NUS. Prior to the NHS, Nick worked internationally with a range of health organisations including the WHO, and Executive Director of the Lancet Countdown, the Global Climate and Health Alliance, and the UK Health Alliance on Climate Change.

    Additional resources mentioned in the podcast

    * Delivering a Net Zero NHS

    * The Lancet Countdown

    * NHS rolls out new electric vehicles

    * US Department of Health and Human Services - Health Sector Commitments to Emissions Reduction and Resilience

    Contact Information:

    If you have any feedback, questions or if you'd like to get in touch, reach out at: [email protected]

    Intro and Out Music Attribution: Music by AudioCoffee from Pixabay



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • “Culture is absolutely the mortar between the bricks and the primary value of Mayo Clinic that everyone knows. From the environmental services folks to the accountants, to the nurses and doctors and social workers, the needs of the patient come first.”

    — Dr. Stephen Swensen, Former Director for Leadership and Organization Development at Mayo Clinic.

    In this episode, Dr. Stephen Swensen previously of the Mayo Clinic, explores leadership at this prestigious healthcare institution. He outlines how being a physician-led organisation allows them to fulfil their mission of patient excellence. This includes discussing their deliberate structure, ethos, and culture. Dr. Swensen explores the importance of an egalitarian approach to valuing staff, key activities to enhance staff engagement and ways to enhance professional satisfaction.

    Follow Dr. Stephen Swensen: LinkedIn

    About our guest: Dr Stephen Swensen has served patients for 35 years at the Mayo Clinic. At Mayo, he was also the Director for Leadership and Organization Development and Chief Quality Officer. He is a Full Professor and was Principal Investigator of two National Institutes of Health grants and has authored three books and 207 articles. He was honoured with the Diamond Lifetime Achievement Award, served as the president of two international societies and founded the Big Sky Group. He holds a Master of Medical Management degree from Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Swensen is a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, where his focus is the creation of Joy in Work.

    Resources mentioned in the podcast

    * Research Article - Leadership by Design: Intentional Organization Development of Physician Leaders

    * Book - Mayo Clinic Strategies To Reduce Burnout: 12 Actions to Create the Ideal Workplace

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "Psychological safety is at the very heart of this discussion... a belief that it is safe for interpersonal risk...in my research I have found this not to be the norm, but it is a very powerful thing when it's there."

    — Professor Amy Edmondson, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School.

    In this episode, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School, Amy Edmondson demystifies the exciting field of Organisational Behavior.

    She begins by discussing her transition from Engineering into the field of Organizational Behavior, how clinicians compare to other professional fields, how identity and blind spots impact health professions and the principles of high-reliability organizations.

    Professor Edmondson explores the concept of the ‘recovery window’, how psychological safety is a core part of successful teams, and how workarounds feel good but may inhibit efforts to solve systemic problems.

    Follow Professor Edmondson: Twitter/X, Linkedin.

    About the guest: Amy C. Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School, a chair established to support the study of human interactions that lead to the creation of successful enterprises which contribute to the betterment of society. Amy is the author of Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate and Compete in the Knowledge Economy (2021), The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, innovation and Growth (2018), and Right Kind of Wrong: the science of failing well (2023).

    Resources mentioned in the podcast:

    * Website: Amy C. Edmondson

    * Newest Book: Right Kind of Wrong, The Science of Failing Well

    * TEDx Talk: Building a Psychologically Safe Workplace

    * Psychological Safety and Learning Behavior in Work Teams

    * How fearless organizations succeed

    * Speeding up Team Learning

    * Edmondson AC, Roberto MA, Bohmer RM, Ferlins EM, Feldman LR, Starbuck WH & Farjoun M. 2005. “The recovery window: Organizational learning following ambiguous threats.” Organization at the limit: Lessons from the Columbia disaster, 220-245.

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • "This is the time for a different kind of leader"

    — Dr Kedar Mate, President and CEO of the Institue for Healthcare Improvement

    In this episode, President and CEO of the IHI, Dr Kedar Mate begins by reflecting on his upbringing and the formative years that impact his values. While working for Partners in Health, he saw first-hand how solving a complex problem in Peru helped him to understand values and complex systems.

    He goes on to highlight the importance of using values-based leadership and the utility of the Quality Improvement (QI) skill set. Next, Dr Mate elaborates on some of the challenges with QI, as well as some of the successes with nationwide healthcare models.

    We conclude with his reflections on taking on the role as the leader of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the importance of self-care.

    Follow Dr Kedar Mate: Twitter/X, Linkedin.

    About the guest; Kedar Mate, MD, is the President and Chief Executive Officer at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and a member of the faculty at Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Mate’s scholarly work has focused on healthcare quality, strategies for achieving large-scale change, and approaches to improving health equity and value.Resources mentioned in the podcast:

    Dr Mate’s podcast Turn on the lights

    The Institution for Healthcare Improvement

    Basics of Quality Improvement - The Science of Improvement Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Cycle

    Partners in Health Website

    Netflix Documentary on Partners in Health - Bending the Arc

    Background of Dr. Paul Farmer

    Music attribution: AudioCoffee from Pixabay.

    Contact information: If you’d like to get in touch, reach out at [email protected]



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com
  • Listen now on Substack, Apple, Spotify, Google or where ever you get your podcasts.

    Welcome to the Introduction to the Clinical Changemakers podcast!

    With the help of some quotes from my guests, I discuss the current problems in healthcare, how clinicians can be at the heart of solving them, and the particular themes for the podcast.

    Thank you for tuning in.



    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.clinicalchangemakers.com