Avsnitt

  • Support the show: patreon.com/blurbs439

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    References:

    Beranek, C. T. (2020). Nocturnal detection of Australian Little Bittern and Australian Painted-snipe–Prospects for nocturnal survey methods for rare wetland birds. The Whistler, 14, 48-53.

    Hassell, C. J., & Rogers, D. I. (2002). Painted Snipe nesting at Taylor's Lagoon near Broome, north-western Australia. Stilt, 41, 14-21.

    Herring, M., & Silcocks, A. (2014). The use of rice fields by the endangered Australian Painted Snipe (Rostratula australis): a rare opportunity to combine food production and conservation?. Stilt, 66, 20-29.

    Jaensch, R. (2009). Further records of Australian painted snipe Rostratula australis in the Lake Eyre Basin, Queensland, with evidence of breeding. Stilt, 56, 40-42.

    Jaensch, R., McCabe, J., Wahl, J., & Houston, W. (2004). Breeding by Australian painted snipe on the Torilla Plain, Brigalow Belt coast, Queensland. The Stilt, 45, 39-42.

    Knuckey, C. G., Trainor, C. R., Firth, R. C. S., Sansom, J. L., & Trainer, J. E. (2013). A record of the Endangered Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula australis (Gould, 1838) in the Fortescue valley, Pilbara region. Wader Study Group Bulletin, 120(1), 11-14.

    Lane, B. A., & Rogers, D. I. (2000). The Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula (benghalensis) australis: an endangered species. The Stilt, 36, 26-34.

    Lindsey, A. (2009). Some observations on the behaviour of the Australian Painted Snipe. The Whistler, 3, 53-54.

    Fraser, N. Some observations of the foraging behaviour of the Australian Painted-snipe and the Greater Painted-snipe. Whistler, 36.

    Fraser, N. (2020). A review of Australian Painted-snipe records from the Hunter Region, 1966-2020. The Whistler, 14, 35-43.

    Rogers, D., Hance, I., Paton, S., Tzaros, C., Griffioen, P., Herring, M., ... & Weston, M. (2005). The breeding bottleneck: Breeding habitat and population decline in the Australian Painted Snipe. Status and Conservation of Seabirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, 15-23.

  • Thanks for listening! (also I meant to say "La" Niña not "El" Niña!)

    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella
    Support the podcast: patreon.com/blurbs439

    References:

    Abzhanov, A. (2010). Darwin's Galapagos finches in modern biology. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 365(1543), 1001-1007.

    Beausoleil, M. O., Lorena Carrión-Avilés, P., Podos, J., Camacho, C., Rabadán-González, J., Richard, R., ... & Hendry, A. P. (2023). The fitness landscape of a community of Darwin’s finches. Evolution, qpad160.

    Carrión, P. L., Raeymaekers, J. A., De León, L. F., Chaves, J. A., Sharpe, D. M., Huber, S. K., ... & Hendry, A. P. (2022). The terroir of the finch: How spatial and temporal variation shapes phenotypic traits in DARWIN'S finches. Ecology and Evolution, 12(10), e9399.

    Carvajal‐Endara, S., Hendry, A. P., Emery, N. C., Neu, C. P., Carmona, D., Gotanda, K. M., ... & Johnson, M. T. (2020). The ecology and evolution of seed predation by Darwin's finches on Tribulus cistoides on the Galápagos Islands. Ecological monographs, 90(1), e01392.

    De León, L. F., Sharpe, D. M., Gotanda, K. M., Raeymaekers, J. A., Chaves, J. A., Hendry, A. P., & Podos, J. (2019). Urbanization erodes niche segregation in Darwin's finches. Evolutionary Applications, 12(7), 1329-1343.

    Enbody, E. D., Sendell-Price, A. T., Sprehn, C. G., Rubin, C. J., Visscher, P. M., Grant, B. R., ... & Andersson, L. (2022). Large effect loci have a prominent role in Darwin’s finch evolution. bioRxiv, 2022-10.

    Funk, E. R., & Burns, K. J. (2018). Biogeographic origins of Darwin's finches (Thraupidae: Coerebinae). The Auk: Ornithological Advances, 135(3), 561-571.

    Harvey, J. A., Chernicky, K., Simons, S. R., Verrett, T. B., Chaves, J. A., & Knutie, S. A. (2021). Urban living influences the nesting success of Darwin’s finches in the Galápagos Islands. Ecology and Evolution, 11(10), 5038-5048.

    Hervías-Parejo, S., Olesen, J. M., Nogales, M., Traveset, A., & Heleno, R. (2019). Dispersal of fern spores by Galápagos finches. Journal of Ornithology, 160, 831-833.

    Knutie, S. A., Chaves, J. A., & Gotanda, K. M. (2019). Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos Islands. Molecular ecology, 28(9), 2441-2450.

    Lawson, L. P., Niedzwiecki, J., & Petren, K. (2019). Darwin's finches: a model of landscape effects on metacommunity dynamics in the Galápagos Archipelago. Ecography, 42(10), 1636-1647.

    Long, K. L., Prothero, D. R., & Syverson, V. J. (2020). How do small birds evolve in response to climate change? Data from the long‐term record at La Brea tar pits. Integrative Zoology, 15(4), 249-261.

    Ranganath, H. A. (2018). Darwin’s finches: a goldmine for evolutionary biologists. Journal of Genetics, 97(4), 807-809.

    Reaney, A. M., Bouchenak‐Khelladi, Y., Tobias, J. A., & Abzhanov, A. (2020). Ecological and morphological determinants of evolutionary diversification in Darwin's finches and their relatives. Ecology and Evolution, 10(24), 14020-14032.

    Román‐Palacios, C., & Wiens, J. J. (2018). The Tortoise and the Finch: Testing for island effects on diversification using two iconic Galápagos radiations. Journal of biogeography, 45(8), 1701-1712.

    Rubin, C. J., Enbody, E. D., Dobreva, M. P., Abzhanov, A., Davis, B. W., Lamichhaney, S., ... & Andersson, L. (2022). Rapid adaptive radiation of Darwin’s finches depends on ancestral genetic modules. Science Advances, 8(27), eabm5982.

    Tattersall, G. J., Chaves, J. A., & Danner, R. M. (2018). Thermoregulatory windows in Darwin's finches. Functional Ecology, 32(2), 358-368.

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  • Learn all about the only bird in the world with a sideways curved beak!

    Support blurbs on Patreon: patreon.com/blurbs439
    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella

    References:

    Adrian, C. R., & Dowding, J. E. (2003). The Wrybill Anarhynchus frontalis: a brief review of status, threats and work in progress. Wader Study Group Bulletin, 100, 20-24.

    Armitage, I. (2007). Wrybills (Anarhynchus frontalis) at the Manawatu River Estuary, North Island, New Zealand. Notornis, 54(2), 118–119.

    Conklin, J. R., Verkuil, Y. I., Riegen, A. C., & Battley, P. F. (2019). How wry is a wrybill?. Wader Study, 126(3), 228–235.

    Crossland, A. C., Crutchley, P., & Mugan, N. (2012). Record number of Wrybill (Anarhynchus frontalis) staging at Lake Ellesmere on southward migration. Stilt, 61, 30–33.

    Hughey, K. F. (1997). The diet of the Wrybill (Anarhynchus frontalis) and the Banded Dotterel (Charadrius bicinctus) on two braided rivers in Canterbury, New Zealand. Notornis, 44, 185–193.

    Hughey, K. F. (1998). Nesting home range sizes of Wrybill (Anarhynchus frontalis) and Banded Dotterel (Charadrius bicinctus) in relation to braided riverbed characteristics. Notornis, 45, 103–111


    Books used for research:

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Birds of New Zealand and Outlying Islands - M.F. Soper

    Birds New Zealand (beauty like no other) - Paul Gibson

    The Brilliance of Birds - Skye Wishart & Edin Whitehead

    Know Your New Zealand Birds - Murdoch Riley

  • The first species to be featured on the podcast that is not endemic to New Zealand! Learn about this parakeets interesting introduction to New Zealand and all the different colour morphs that are out there to be seen!

    Support the show: patreon.com/blurbs439
    Reach out on instagram: matt.rossella


    Books used for research:

    A mini guide to the identification of New Zealand’s land birds - Andrew Crowe

    Birds of New Zealand and Outlying Islands - M.F Soper

    Birds New Zealand (beauty like no other), 2nd edition - Paul Gibson

    Complete Book of New Zealand Birds - Readers Digest


    References:

    Carter, M. (1996). Nesting Rosellas' Platycercus' spp.: Innovative site selection and notes on repeat breeding and other behaviour. Australian Bird Watcher, 16(8), 344-348.

    De Graaff, T. (1998). Rosellas; an Australian viewpoint: aviculture of the eastern rosella. AFA Watchbird, 25(2), 44-47.

    Galbraith, J. A., Fraser, E. A., Clout, M. N., & Hauber, M. E. (2011). Survey duration and season influence the detection of introduced eastern rosella (Platycercus eximius) in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 38(3), 223-235.

    Pence, M., Torcello, J., & Sanderson, K. (1995) Observations of coexistence between Adelaide and eastern rosellas (platycerus spp.) In Adelaide. South Australian Ornithologist, 32, 25-32.

    Shipham, A., Schmidt, D. J., Joseph, L., & Hughes, J. M. (2017). A genomic approach reinforces a hypothesis of mitochondrial capture in eastern Australian rosellas. The Auk: Ornithological Advances, 134(1), 181-192.

    Thompson, D. R. (1998) Rosellas; a US viewpoint: The Eastern Rosella in the US. AFA Watchbird, 25(2), 47-49.

    Tzaros, C. L. (1992). The Red Variety of the Eastern Rosella. Australian Bird Watcher, 14(6), 226-229.

    Wright, D., & Clout, M. N. (2001). The eastern rosella (Platycercus eximius) in New Zealand (pp. 5-27). Department of Conservation.

  • What mental health benefits does birding provide? What are the important factors to birding that facilitate this? listen to find out!

    Support the podcast: patreon.com/blurbs439
    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella

    References:

    Bonta, M. (2008). Valorizing the relationships between people and birds: Experiences and lessons from Honduras. Ornitologia Neotropical, 19(Suppl), 595-604.

    Cox, D. T., & Gaston, K. J. (2015). Likeability of garden birds: Importance of species knowledge & richness in connecting people to nature. PloS one, 10(11), e0141505.

    Cox, D. T., Shanahan, D. F., Hudson, H. L., Plummer, K. E., Siriwardena, G. M., Fuller, R. A., ... & Gaston, K. J. (2017). Doses of neighborhood nature: the benefits for mental health of living with nature. AIBS Bulletin, 67(2), 147-155.

    Hammoud, R., Tognin, S., Burgess, L., Bergou, N., Smythe, M., Gibbons, J., ... & Mechelli, A. (2022). Smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment reveals mental health benefits of birdlife. Scientific reports, 12(1), 17589.

    Lee, S., McMahan, K., & Scott, D. (2015). The gendered nature of serious birdwatching. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 20(1), 47-64.

    Marselle, M. R., Martens, D., Dallimer, M., & Irvine, K. N. (2019). Review of the mental health and well-being benefits of biodiversity. Biodiversity and health in the face of climate change, 175-211.

    Randler, C., Murawiec, S., & Tryjanowski, P. (2022). Committed bird-watchers gain greater psychological restorative benefits compared to those less committed regardless of expertise. Ecopsychology, 14(2), 101-110.

    Wolf, L. J., Zu Ermgassen, S., Balmford, A., White, M., & Weinstein, N. (2017). Is variety the spice of life? An experimental investigation into the effects of species richness on self-reported mental well-being. PloS one, 12(1), e0170225.

  • Learn all about the extinct Huia and the title that it holds amongst all modern bird species!

    Support me to keep creating content: https://www.patreon.com/blurbs439
    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella

    References:

    Frith, C. B. (1997). Huia (Heteralocha acutirostris: Callaeidae)-like sexual bill dimorphism in some birds of paradise (Paradisaeidae) and its significance. Notornis, 44, 177-184.

    Lambert, D. M., Shepherd, L. D., Huynen, L., Beans-Picon, G., Walter, G. H., & Millar, C. D. (2009). The molecular ecology of the extinct New Zealand huia. PLoS One, 4(11), e8019.

    Monson, C. S. (2005). Cultural constraints and corrosive colonization: Western commerce in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the extinction of the huia. Pacific Studies, 28, 26-26.

    Selander, R. K. (1966). Sexual dimorphism and differential niche utilization in birds. The Condor, 68(2), 113-151.

    Tebbutt, S. J., & Simons, C. (2002). Gene sequences from New Zealand's extinct Huia. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 32(2), 327-335.

    Tomotani, B. M., Salvador, R. B., Sabadel, A. J., Miskelly, C. M., Brown, J. C., Delgado, J., ... & Bury, S. J. (2022). Extreme bill dimorphism leads to different but overlapping isotopic niches and similar trophic positions in sexes of the charismatic extinct huia. Oecologia, 198(1), 67-77.


    Books used for research:

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Birds New Zealand (beauty like no other) - Paul Gibson

    Complete Book of New Zealand Birds - Readers Digest

  • Learn all about the Fernbird (Mātātā)! A New Zealand endemic species that is more often heard than seen!

    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella
    Support the podcast: patreon.com/blurbs439


    References:

    Anderson, S., & Ogden, J. (2003). The bird community of Kaitoke wetland, Great Barrier Island. Notornis, 50(4), 201-210.

    Best, H. A. (1973). The biology of the Snares fernbird, Bowdleria punctata caudata (Buller, 1894).

    Best, H. A. (1979). Food and foraging behaviour of the Snares fernbird. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 6(3), 481-488.

    Hill, S. D., Bishop, C., & Landers, T. J. (2015). Avian biodiversity in the coastal wetlands of the Okahukura Peninsula. New Zealand journal of zoology, 42(1), 44-50.

    Olson, S. L. (1990). Osteology and systematics of the fernbirds (Bowdleria: Sylviidae). Notornis.

    O’Donnell, C. F., Clapperton, B. K., & Monks, J. M. (2015). Impacts of introduced mammalian predators on indigenous birds of freshwater wetlands in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Ecology, 39(1), 19-33.

    Parker, K. A. (2002). Ecology and management of North Island fernbird (Bowdleria punctata vealeae) (Doctoral dissertation, University of Auckland).

    Van Klink, P., Kemp, J., & O'Donnell, C. F. J. (2013). The effect of aerial application of 1080 cereal baits on radio-tagged South Island fernbirds (Bowdleria punctata punctata). New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 40(2), 145-153.


    Books used for research:

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Birds New Zealand (beauty like no other) - Paul Gibson

    Complete Book of New Zealand Birds - Readers Digest

    The Brilliance of Birds - Skye Wishart and Edin Whitehead

  • Learn all about the world’s rarest seabird, the Chatham Island Tāiko!

    Support the show: patreon.com/blurbs439
    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella

    References:

    Ellegren, H., & Galtier, N. (2016). Determinants of genetic diversity. Nature Reviews Genetics, 17(7), 422-433.

    Imber, M. J., Taylor, G. A., Tennyson, A. J. D., Aikman, H. A., Scofield, R. P., Ballantyne, J., & Crockett, D. E. (2005). Non‐breeding behaviour of Magenta Petrels Pterodroma magentae at Chatham Island, New Zealand. Ibis, 147(4), 758-763.

    Johnston, R. B., Bettany, S. M., Ogle, R. M., Aikman, H. A., Taylor, G. A., & IMBER, M. J. (2003). Breeding and fledging behaviour of the Chatham Taiko (Magenta Petrel) Pterodroma magentae, and predator activity at burrows. Marine Ornithology, 31, 193-197.

    Lawrence, H. A. (2008). Conservation genetics of the world's most endangered seabird, the Chatham Island tāiko (Pterodroma magentae): a thesis presented in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Biosciences at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand (Doctoral dissertation, Massey University).

    Lawrence, H. A., Scofield, R. P., Millar, C. D., & Lambert, D. M. (2008). DNA sequencing detects an additional museum specimen of the Chatham Island Taiko (Pterodroma magentae). Notornis, 55, 216-218.

    Lawrence, H. A., Taylor, G. A., Millar, C. D., & Lambert, D. M. (2008). High mitochondrial and nuclear genetic diversity in one of the world’s most endangered seabirds, the Chatham Island Taiko (Pterodroma magentae). Conservation Genetics, 9, 1293-1301.

    Solomon, M., & Thorpe, S. (2012). Taonga moriori: recording and revival. Journal of Material Culture, 17(3), 245-263.

    Taylor, G., Cockburn, S., Palmer, D., & Liddy, P. (2012). Breeding activity of Chatham Island taiko (Pterodroma magentae) monitored using PIT tag recorders. New Zealand journal of ecology, 36(3), 1-8.

    Books used for research:

    Birds New Zealand (beauty like no other) - Paul Gibson

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Complete Book of New Zealand Birds - Readers Digest

  • This episode is all about what I find particularly interesting regarding the South Island Takahē, as well as a bit about other members of the genus Porphyrio in New Zealand.

    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella
    Support the show on patreon: patreon.com/blurbs439

    References:

    Boast, A. P. (2019). A Holocene fossil South Island takahē (Porphyrio hochstetteri) in a high-altitude north-west Nelson cave. Notornis, 66, 34-36.

    Trewick, S. A. (1996). Morphology and evolution of two takahe: flightless rails of New Zealand. Journal of Zoology, 238(2), 221-237.


    Books used for research:

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Takahē (Bird of Dreams) - Alison Ballance

  • This episode is all about the South Island Kōkako - a New Zealand bird that may or may not still exist! Have a listen to find out where it might be, and what to look/listen for!

    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella
    Email me: [email protected]
    Support the show: patreon.com/blurbs439

    References:

    Milne, A., & Stocker, R. (2014). Evidence for the continued existence of the South Island kokako (Callaeas cinerea) drawn from reports collected between January 1990 and June 2012. Notornis, 61, 137-143.


    Books / websites used for research:

    A mini guide to the identification of New Zealand’s land birds - Andrew Crowe

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Complete Book of New Zealand Birds - Readers Digest

    Know your New Zealand birds - Murdoch Riley

    New Zealand native birds of bush and countryside - Penguin books

    The Birds Around Us - Geoff Moon

    The Brilliance of Birds - Skye Wishart and Edin Whitehead

    https://www.southislandkokako.org/

  • Hey guys! Im Matt, bird enthusiast from New Zealand! This episode is all about the most ancient lineage of surviving New Zealand birds!

    Follow me on instagram: matt.rossella

    Become a blurb bro (a.k.a supporting the project) by contributing at https://www.patreon.com/blurbs439

    If you want to know where I got my information, please see below!

    References:

    Ericson, P. G., Christidis, L., Cooper, A., Irestedt, M., Jackson, J., Johansson, U. S., & Norman, J. A. (2002). A Gondwanan origin of passerine birds supported by DNA sequences of the endemic New Zealand wrens. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences, 269(1488), 235-241.

    Manegold, A. (2009). The early fossil record of perching birds (Passeriformes). Palaeont. Afr., 44, 103-107.

    Mayr, G., & Manegold, A. (2006). New specimens of the earliest European passeriform bird. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 51(2).

    Mitchell, K. J., Wood, J. R., Llamas, B., McLenachan, P. A., Kardailsky, O., Scofield, R. P., ... & Cooper, A. (2016). Ancient mitochondrial genomes clarify the evolutionary history of New Zealand’s enigmatic acanthisittid wrens. Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, 102, 295-304.

    McNab, B. K., & Weston, K. A. (2020). Does the New Zealand rockwren (Xenicus gilviventris) hibernate?. Journal of Experimental Biology, 223(9), jeb212126.

    Oliveros, C. H., Field, D. J., Ksepka, D. T., Barker, F. K., Aleixo, A., Andersen, M. J., ... & Faircloth, B. C. (2019). Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(16), 7916-7925.

    Sibley, C. G., Williams, G. R., & Ahlquist, J. E. (1982). The relationships of the New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) as indicated by DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Worthy, T. H., Hand, S. J., Nguyen, J. M., Tennyson, A. J., Worthy, J. P., Scofield, R. P., ... & Archer, M. (2010). Biogeographical and phylogenetic implications of an early Miocene wren (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthisittidae) from New Zealand. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(2), 479-498.

    Verry, A. J., Scarsbrook, L., Scofield, R. P., Tennyson, A. J., Weston, K. A., Robertson, B. C., & Rawlence, N. J. (2019). Who, where, what, wren? Using ancient DNA to examine the veracity of museum specimen data: a case study of the New Zealand rock wren (Xenicus gilviventris). Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, 496.

    Books used for research:

    A mini guide to the identification of New Zealand’s land birds - Andrew Crowe

    Birdstories - Geoff Norman

    Flight of the Huia - Kerry-Jayne Wilson

    Know your New Zealand birds - Murdoch Riley

    New Zealand native birds of bush and countryside - Penguin books

    The Brilliance of Birds - Skye Wishart and Edin Whitehead


    See you in the next episode! Thanks for listening!

    - Matt