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  • Today, I’m delighted to share the first “Sitting In” mini-series episode with you, where I’ve handed the podcast reins over to a music preservationist and performer. First up, is a story of the African American spiritual turned protest song called “We Shall Not Be Moved”, written and spoken by Matthew Sabatella.

    Matthew’s mission is to “connect people with music that is woven into the fabric of the United States”. He’s a singer, writer, multi-instrumentalist and award-winning old-time banjo player, music historian, leader of the Rambling String Band, and serves on the board of directors for Southeast regional chapter of Folk Alliance International. He’s also the founder of Ballad of America, an educational non-profit that not only provides and develops vital resources for preserving all of the songs and genres that have shaped America, but also travels to colleges and universities to give educational lectures and presentations to spread awareness of this important history directly down the generational ladder.

    I can’t wait to share all the “Sitting In” episodes with you over the next several weeks, they’re all very different, entertaining and educational. Matt’s also got a great radio voice, so enjoy!

    Follow on Instagram:

    @Balladofamerica 

    @ramblingstringband

    @sabatellamusic

    Links:

    Matthew Sabatella - https://www.matthewsabatella.com

    Ballad of America - https://www.balladofamerica.org

    Rambling String Band - https://www.ramblingstringband.com

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Today I have the pleasure of sharing a conversation I had with multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter Jay Cobb Anderson, co-founder of the group Fruition, who has been making big waves in the major festival circuit during the last decade with blends of traditional sounds, contemporary folk and bluegrass, and most recently the roots of rock and roll.

    We talked about Jay’s busking journey, how he reached the other members of Fruition, how they developed their sound, about Bob Dylan and the wake he left for so many to dive into old music, how traditional music fits into his life today and the music he creates, some interesting stories and a few artists that I hadn’t heard of.

    --

    Follow on Instagram:

    @JayCobbAnderson

    @fruitionpdx

    @tkandtheholyknownothings

    Jay's Musical Projects:

    Fruition - https://www.fruitionband.com/home

    TK and the Holy Know-Nothings - https://www.tkandtheholyknownothings.com/

    Jay Cobb Anderson - https://www.jaycobbanderson.com/

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
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  • Today, I’m delighted to share a talk I had with mandolin prodigy and Grammy nominated multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter Sierra Hull. Accomplishing more in her first 28 years of life than most could over a few lifetimes, Sierra made her Grand Ole Opry debut at the age of 10, played Carnegie Hall at age 12, then landed a deal with Rounder Records at 13. Sierra was mentored by Alison Krauss and Chris Thile, she’s collaborated with all the big hitters in bluegrass from Ricky Skaggs, to Bela Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglass and Sturgill Simpson. Despite all those big names I threw out there, as you’ll hear Sierra could not be more humble.

    In early 2020, she released her fourth critically acclaimed record “25 Trips”, an inventive piece of work revealing her profound warmth as a storyteller, building off Sierra’s bluegrass roots and venturing into entirely new terrain.

    We talked about her childhood, small town living, the broad palette of music and bottomless well of traditional music, we geeked out on Tony Rice and Doc Watson, and Sierra shared r a few in depth wild stories that led her down the path she’s on.

    More on Sierra Hull: 

    Official - https://www.sierrahull.com/

    Sierra and Husband Justin Moses "Little Liza Jane" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Eg2TotshKs

    --

    Find American Songcatcher on Instagram - https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    Want to help this independent program chug along? Visit the Patreon page to find out how you can support for as little as $3 a month!

    https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Today, I have the pleasure of sharing a conversation I had with Oliver Wood. Since 2004, Oliver has been the frontman of The Wood Brothers, blurring the boundaries between folk, gospel, country-soul, and blues, earning an international audience and a Grammy Award-nomination along the way. Alongside his brother Chris Wood, of Medeski Martin and Wood, as well as percussionist Jano Rix, The Wood Brothers have embodied the future of roots music, while at the same time turning it on its head.

    Released yesterday, Oliver’s debut solo album, Always Smilin' reimagines his sharp songwriting, savvy guitar chops, and one-of-a-kind voice in a new light. He didn’t do it alone, as Jano Rix, Susan Tedeschi, Hiss Golden Messenger's Phil Cook, John Medeski, and several others also make appearances. Embracing the full range of his musical heritage, Always Smilin’ builds upon the blues and gospel sounds Oliver explored long before The Wood Brothers' formed, and galvanizes the roots music he's been making during the past two decades.

    We talked about his long history before starting The Wood Brothers with Chris, their shared wealth of music education from their musical father, how traditional music has informed The Wood Brothers and his solo project, geek out on some unknown roots musicians and much more. Enjoy!

    Listen to Oliver’s new solo record Always Smilin’ - https://oliverwoodmusic.bandcamp.com/album/always-smilin

    Official Website - https://www.oliverwoodmusic.com

    The Wood Brothers - https://www.thewoodbros.com

    --

    This interview was made possible by the community on Patreon. For as little as $3 a month, you can directly support the team behind American Songcatcher make this program all it can be.

    Visit the Patreon site today and support if you have the means - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    Follow AS on Instagram - https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • When I first set out with this podcast there were a few people in particular that I wanted to talk to, and today's guest is at the top of that list.

    David Holt is a four-time Grammy winner, multi-instrumentalist, and for 14 years performed as a duo on banjo with the legendary Doc Watson. He’s spent his life learning, performing and telling stories of traditional American music as the host of numerous radio and television shows including: Riverwalk Jazz, Folkways, Great Scenic Railway Journeys, Fire on the Mountain, and today, David Holt’s State of Music. The PBS TV series features modern masters of American roots music who share their stories, talk music history, and collaborate with David on a few tunes. He’s hosted the likes of Taj Mahal, Jerry Douglas, Keb Mo, Rhiannon Giddens, Steep Canyon Rangers, Dom Flemons, and Blind Boy Paxton.

    We talked about his long history, how he got into storytelling and hosting, his mentors, the time he spent with Doc Watson and a few stories, how traditional music fits in today’s culture, and what he’s doing today with State of Music. There are some moments when David is showing me photographs while he talks, so if you’d like to see the video, it’s available through Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher.

    Links:

    Legacy Album with Doc Watson

    Official Website

    PBS: David Holt’s State of Music

    Follow State of Music on Instagram

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “The Cuckoo” (:27)

    Willie Nelson - “Lucky Old Sun’” (13:30)

    Jerry Garcia - “Walkin’ Boss” (31:40)

    Blaze Foley - “Oval Room” (52:50)

    Jontavious Willis - “Pistol Slappin’ Blues” (1:12:38)

    Teaser:

    This traditional tune is based off of England’s oldest known documented song, dating back to the 13th century, centered around a bird who calls in spring. He’s one of America’s most well known musicians, responsible for completely changing the face of country music, though originally, he didn’t fit in because of his odd vocal phrasing. Most know him as the laid back lead guitarist of one of the most prolific jam bands, gone too soon, but he brought more traditional songs to the fold than most folk singers. The duct tape messiah, a living obscurity from the Austin singer-songwriter scene of the 70’s and 80’s, and one of the greatest poets to be hardly known. There aren’t many young African Americans taking up pre-war blues and the original stylings of the acoustic guitar, but this infectious young man takes people back in time.

    Follow AS on Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    Support Independent Programming:

    Join the Patreon - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    "Shine A Light":

    Club Passim - https://www.passim.org/

    Source Credits:

    #1: OldWeirdAmerica | Anthology of American Folk Music | MamaLisa.com | Mainly Norfolk | Duke.edu

    #2: Willie nelson Museum | Biography | The Famous People | The Guardian | PBS

    #3: Blacklisted Journal Levity.com | Aforum.com | Variety | Rolling Stone | Living Room Candidate

    #4: Rolling Stone | Official Blaze Foley Site | Wide Open Country  |

    Blaze Foley Movie

    #5: Official Website | The Kurland Agency | Handy Blues | The Country Blues

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Today on the program, I have the distinct pleasure of sharing a wonderful conversation I had with Leah Song, one half of the world folk fusion group Rising Appalachia. Over the last decade, Rising Appalachia has reimagined a huge body of traditional songs to a massive audience over the seven records they’ve released since forging their musical path. We talked about how she and her sister Chloe grew up, how they will continue unpacking the musicology lessons they’ve received from their fiddle folklorist mother, how traditional music fits into their landscape of sounds, the importance of preservation, and the wild stories of how they came to be.

    Leah was also kind enough to record a few videos of traditional songs for the show, and for the AS Patreon supporters. Become a part of the AS Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month to the see the videos in full, and more exclusive content here: https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    Follow:

    @LeahSongMusic - https://www.instagram.com/LeahSongMusic

    @RisingAppalachia - https://www.instagram.com/Rising Appalachia

    @AmericanSongcatcher - https://www.instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “Barbara Allen” (:27)

    Lead Belly - “Goodnight, Irene’” (11:39)

    Joan Baez - “Silver Dagger” (37:50)

    Tony Rice - “New River Train” (59:35)

    Colter Wall- “Diamond Joe” (1:13:14)

    Teaser:

    For the last 400 years, the most widely collected ballad from the British Isles is still being recorded today, born out of a unique and puzzling story. A larger than life figure, rumored to have been released from prison due to the diverse musical prowess he carried, and not only became friends with legends like Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, he was one of their main influences. her supple soprano voice is one of the most distinct in any genre, she’s graced nearly every traditional ballad with it, and used it during every major civil rights movement moment of the 60’s and 70’s, and continues to do the same today. Responsible for completely altering the confines of bluegrass music, expanding the genre to breathe in folk, jazz, blues and popular music, and is one of the most highly regarded guitarists of the century.  When you hear the deep, husky and timeless voice of this 25 year-old legend-in-the-making, singing folk ballads, westerns and cowboy tunes and dragging them over the plains of his home near the Canada-Montana border, it likely will never leave your memory.

    Follow AS on Instagram - https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    Join the Patreon - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    "Shine A Light":

    Basic Folk Podcast - https://cindyhowes.net/basicfolk/

    Source Credits:

    #1: American Songwriter | Library of Congress | Lizlyle Blog | Native Ground

    #2: Cultural Equity | NPS | Houston IA Mag

    #3: GQ | Washington Post | Notable Biographies | Rolling Stone

    #4: Tony Rice Story | Rolling Stone | NY Times

    #5: American Songwriter | Rolling Stone | The New Yorker | The Globe and Mail

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Today on the program, I’m delighted to share a conversation I had with the Grammy-winning multi-instrumentalist and preservationist Dom Flemons. Branded The American Songster from his diverse catalogue of tunes, Dom’s not just a songwriter, he’s a multi-instrumentalist, producer, actor, music scholar, historian, and record collector who is proficient on banjo, guitar, harmonica, jug, percussion, quills, fife and rhythm bones.⁠

    We talked about his early life, The Carolina Chocolate Drops, music preservation and the journey to becoming a historian and musicologist. He also played a few tunes and shared some stories about a few essential folk and blues artists, and the current folk and blues revival.⁠

    Dom's Links:

    Official Website - https://www.theamericansongster.com

    Instagram @DomFlemons - https://www.instagram.com/domflemons


    Join the AS Patreon Community - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “Midnight Special” (:39)

    Memphis Jug Band - “Stealin’, Stealin’” (13:30)

    Etta Baker - “Railroad Bill” (26:13)

    Big Bill Broonzy - “Glory of Love” (40:55)

    Charley Pride - “Roll on Mississippi” (1:01:32)

    Teaser:

    When the light of the train hits the cell windows of inmates at Mississippi’s infamous Parchman Farm prison, they feel a release and comfort from their captors. Find out what made jug bands so popular in the 1930’s, and the Tennessee natives at the helm of that movement. Yet another fingerpicking legend, left in obscurity until later in life, though she still managed to inspire generations of guitar players. The Ambassador of the Blues left behind a life cloaked in mystery, but this Chicago legend by way of the South left a massive mark as he carried old styles of blues through the 1950’s. For far too long country music has cast aside its African American roots, but one musician blended the color lines and became one of the most decorated country musicians of the century.⁠

    Follow AS:

    Instagram

    Support Independent Programming:

    Join the Patreon, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    "Shine A Light":

    Dust to Digital

    Source Credits:

    #1: Vera | NAACP | WordsMusic&Stories  | Smithsonian Folkways | Songfacts

    #2: Jugstore | Memphis Music HOF | UCSB Library | American Blues Scene | NPS

    #3: Story by Glen C Herbert - The Bluegrass Situation | Music Maker | Blue Ridge Heritage Center | OurState.com

    #4: Cultural Equity |  Broonzy.com | NPR | People’s World | MS Writers & Music

    #5:  Story by Cody Uhls - Official Website |  NPR |  Rolling Stone |  Country Music Hall of Fame

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “Gypsy Davy” (:20)

    Son House - “Grinnin’ in your Face” (9:02)

    Merle Travis - “Nine Pound Hammer” (24:07)

    Dolly Parton - “Jolene” (40:30)

    Sierra Ferrell - “Elk River Blues” (59:60)

    Teaser:

    Who were the original gypsies, and why are so many songs sung about them? Hear the man who inspired Robert Johnson and set the standard for the Delta blues slide guitar. A boy born out of the Kentucky coal mines and creating the epitome of guitar fingerpicking styles known today as “Travis Picking”. Perhaps the most decorated country singer, philanthropist and unifying voice, a woman who has led countless other country artists and musicians for 50 years, still going strong. A young troubadour who is changing the timbre of country music, mixing it with eclectic roots while transporting listeners to another time.

    Follow AS:

    Instagram

    Support Independent Programming:

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    "Shine A Light":

    Folk Alley | Instagram

    Source Credits:

    #1 Contemplator | Mainly Norfolk | Lizlyle | History Today | Harvard magazine | Second hand Songs | Enacademic

    #2 Louder Sound | MS Blues Trail | New World Encyclopedia | MS Writers & Musicians | Black Past | Democrat and Chronicle | George Lamplugh | Digital NEPR

    #3 Story by Glen C Herbert + NY Times | Alan Cackett | Oldies

    #4 Official Site | The List | PBS | Britannica | Tennessee Encyclopedia | Library of Congress | The New Yorker | NY Times

    #5  Wide Open Country | WV Gazette | Saving Country Music | Official Site | Wautauga Democrat | HonkyTonkBadonkaDonk

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “The Ballad of John Henry” (:25)

    The Mississippi Sheiks - “Sittin On Top of the World” (11:09)

    Pete Seeger - “If I Had a Hammer” (22:05)

    Hank Williams - “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” (44:32)

    Tyler Childers - “Rocks, Salt and Nails” (1:05:35)

    Teaser:

    Was the greatest African American folklore hero based on a true story? The most popular old time and blues string band in the 30's that all started with one insanely talented family. One of the hardest working advocates and activists who spent many years carrying old songs forward and getting audiences to sing together, banned from performing by the US government. The King of Country music, who lived perhaps one of the most paradoxically tragic and successful lives ever documented in American music. A Kentucky native born in the home of bluegrass revives and redefines country music today and reclaims its soul.

    Follow:

    Instagram | Facebook

    Support Independent Programming:

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    "Shine A Light":

    History of Country Music

    Source Credits:

    #1: ABAA | National Park Service | LOC | Ibiblio

    #2: Document Record Store | Old Time Party  | Delta Blues Gospel 

    #3: Michael Hayes | Histclo | Folkways | LOC | ThoughtCo

    #4: Hank Williams Story | Tennessean | Hankmuseum | Grunge

    #5: (Written by Glen C Herbert) + Rolling Stone | Chicago Tribune | Official Website

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:


    Traditional - “Wayfaring Stranger” (:30)

    Burl Ives - “Streets of Laredo” (11:45)

    Sister Rosetta Tharpe - “Up Above My Head” (28:50)

    John Prine - “In Spite of Ourselves” (44:27)

    Charley Crockett- “That’s How I Got To Memphis” (1:06:40)


    Teaser:

    Did it come from a hymn? An old ballad? Was it born in Scotland, or America? Navigate these questions with me for one of the most enduring and well known traditional songs in Bluegrass, Folk, and Old Country music. Entrenched in the old ballads passed on to him before the age seven, a man becomes one of the most beloved preservationist folk singers. A queer evangelist and powerhouse vocalist and guitarist is named the “Godmother of Rock and Roll” influencing Chuck Berry, Elvis, and Eric Clapton. A Chicago mailman finds himself at the right place at the right time to share his timeless and instantly relatable songs, staying out of the mainstream, yet dubbed an American icon. From Texas, by way of New Orleans, a young man defines hard, transient living and grows into one of the finest true country musicians performing today.⁠

    Support Independent Programming:

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    Follow:

    Instagram | Facebook

    "Shine A Light":

    Western AF

    Source Credits:

    #1: Jopie Bopie Blog | Manhattan Beach Music | Library of Congress

    #2: Cultural Equity | Independent | Info Please | Cowboy’s Lament

    #3: NPR | Richmond Mag | Girlboss | Story of Sister Rosetta Tharpe

    #4: Billboard.com | Rolling Stone | JP Shrine.org | NY Times | Blue Railroad

    #5: Long Reads | Rolling Stone | The Guardian | Chron.com | The Boot

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - “Tom Dooley” (:27)

    Blind Blake - “Diddie Wa Diddie” (12:23)

    Woody Guthrie - “Ramblin Around” (23:46)

    Doc Watson - “Blue Railroad Train” (49:00)

    Justin Townes Earle - “Lone Pine Hill”(1:08:23)

    Teaser:

    A North Carolina murder ballad turned folk tale withstands the tests of time, the true story is still up for debate today. The most distinct blind guitar player to take sounds from ragtime piano and transfer it to guitar, though his life was a short mystery.   A folk singer from Oklahoma becomes the voice of social justice, poverty and failed politics for generations after him. A flat picking blind Appalachian turns the guitar from a background rhythm instrument into a lead in bluegrass, country and folk music during the 60’s, and becomes a pioneer of country blues. Born in the shadow of his father, a young man rises into Americana stardom on his own from a lyrical conviction that many songwriters never acquire, another gone too soon.

    Follow AS: Instagram | Facebook

    Support Independent Programming: Join the Patreon community, or Venmo or PayPal

    "Shine A Light": David Holt’s State of Music on PBS

    Source Credits:

    #1: True West Magazine | NPR | Kronsell.net - Legend and Facts

    #2: Oldies | All About Blues | Slim Pickens & Dr. Baz

    #3: WoodyGuthrie.org | The New Yorker | Texas Observer 

    #4: Docs Guitar | NC History | NY Times

    #5: Westword | First Avenue | Rolling Stone | GQ

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • I’m so pleased to have my first guest on the podcast, the incredibly gifted multi-instrumentalist, teacher, musicologist and songster Mr. Andy Cohen. You may remember Andy from a mention in Episode 2 of American Songcatcher, as he was the mentor of my mentor, Joan Crane. Once a lead boy soaking in the shadow of Reverend Gary Davis, Andy’s been playing music for 72 years. He’s a virtuoso finger-style guitarist and pianist who has been described as “a walking, talking folk-blues-roots music encyclopedia.” He has devoted his entire life to studying, performing, and promoting traditional blues and folk music, specializing in the pre-World War II era. Country Blues Magazine says, “One thing is for sure, the boy can play. There are few people around today who had a chance to pick it all up from the old generations, get this good at it, and continue to cherish and preserve the old traditions.”⁠ 


    Before we started, I had a load of questions for Andy, but as you’ll hear, he holds the conversation without them. I took a backseat for this history lesson, so there’s not many words from me. Andy plays a few tunes, tells how his librarian set him on a course, about his vast knowledge of many lesser known blues artists, and shares stories about the Reverend Gary Davis that I was unaware of. Fair warning, the audio from our Zoom chat isn’t the best quality, I’m new at this.

    More on Andy Cohen:
    Website | Videos | Discography | Biography

    Riverlark Music Site

    Facebook

    Interested in supporting this independent program?

    Join the Patreon community
    Subscribe and Share
    Send a donation through Venmo or PayPal

    Host Links:

    Nicholas Edward Williams

    Facebook | Instagram | Website

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional - "Rising Sun Blues" or "House of the Rising Sun" (1:37)

    Bessie Smith - "Tain't Nobody's Business" (16:46)

    The Carter Family - "Wildwood Flower" (40:30)

    Townes Van Zandt - "Pancho and Lefty" (1:04:17)

    Blind Boy Paxton - "Nobody Cares For Me" (01:22:42)

    Teaser:

    Was there ever a “house of the rising sun” in New Orleans or elsewhere, or was it a myth brought from the UK? Raised by her sisters in deep poverty, a Chattanooga girl rises to be known as “Empress of the Blues” right before The Great Depression, gone too soon.  How did one family become responsible for making mountain and country music mainstream in America? A Texas songwriter whose life paralleled the tragically poetic songs he wrote. Today, a young man who grew up in LA transports audiences to soundscapes of the 20’s and 30’s.

    Supporting independent programs!

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    "Shine A Light":

    www.BalladofAmerica.org

    Source Credits:

    #1:  American Blues Scene | The Vintage News | LA Times

    #2: My Black History | NNDB | History.com

    #3: NPR | Encyclopedia Virginia

    #4: Traces of Townes | Texas Monthly

    #5: The Bluegrass Situation | Village Voice

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode:

    Traditional | Bascom Lamar Lunsford - “I wish I was a Mole in the ground" (:27)

    Mississippi John Hurt - “Spike Driver Blues” (13:50)

    Reverend Gary Davis - "Slow Drag” (28:23)

    Norman Blake - "Church Street Blues” (42:26)

    Willie Watson - "James Alley Blues” (56:08)

    Teaser:

    A North Carolina mountain banjo player dubbed the "Minstrel of the Appalachians" helps create America’s first folk festivals and preserves history as one of the country's earliest song collectors. A sharecropper is discovered as one of the founding fathers of folk blues, nearly 40 years after his first recordings. A blind virtuoso has a hard upbringing, turns into a reverend, and goes on to teach generations of some of the finest guitar players. A 16 year old boy quits school to pursue music and becomes one of the most decorated guitar players in history, with wife equally as talented. After landing success with Old Crow Medicine Show, a man goes alone and discovers his path of preserving old songs.

    Interested in supporting this independent program?

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    Follow:

    Facebook | Instagram 

    "Shine A Light":

    Pickin’ for Progress

    Web Source Credits:

    #1: Ballad of a Mountain Man | NCpedia | Blue Ridge Heritage

    #2: MJH Foundation | MS Blues Trail | MJH: His Life, His Times, His Blues

    #3: Cultural Equity | NCPedia 

    #4: The Bluegrass Situation | NPR

    #5: Lyric Magazine | OCMS | Red Line Roots | Chicago Tribune

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Featured in this Episode: 

    Traditional - "Peggy O" (:28)

     Jimmie Rodgers - "Waiting For a Train" (8:01)

    Elizabeth Cotten - "Shake Sugaree" (15:23)

    Dave Van Ronk - "Green, Green Rocky Road" (25:40)

    Gillian Welch - "Everything is Free"  (35:26)

    Teaser:

    A traditional Scottish song survives over 300 years, traveling thousands of miles before filtering through the Appalachian Mountains and becoming a folk "pass along" tune. “The Singing Brakeman” comes alive after witnessing the yodeling of Swiss emissaries, creating the original country music sound. A woman in her 60’s falls into a household worker position for the Seeger Family, and they discover a talent left behind 30 years ago that would inspire generations of guitar players. A man who was bigger in person than the myths that followed him, personifying emotion through old songs. And a living legend, who punctures holes in hearts with her incomparable songwriting, transformed by The Stanley Brothers.

    Interested in supporting this independent program? 

    Join the Patreon community, or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal

    Follow:

    Facebook | Instagram 


    "Shine A Light":
    GemsOnVHS

    Source Credits: 

    #1: WhiteGum | Weeping Willow Guitar | The Jovial Crew

    #2: Bluegrass Today | Official Website

    #3: Folkways | Rainbow Quest

    #4: The Vinyl District | Folkways | Elijah Wald | Guitar Workshop

    #5: The Guardian | The New Yorker | Rolling Stone 

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
  • Tracing the roots of American music from it’s emigrated past to current artists playing the songs forward, folk singer-songwriter and amateur musicologist Nicholas Edward Williams is not hosting your typical music podcast. Each episode uncovers unique stories and lesser-known facts behind five songs, spanning from those created centuries ago to those carrying tradition today. Then, as folk artists have always done, Williams re-creates them. From European immigrants who brought their tunes into the Appalachian mountains, to songs of the South: Gospel, Ragtime, Blues, Country, and the Folk music derived from it all. We’ll go behind the curtain of legends, and shine the limelight on many integral lesser-known artists who have influenced generations, such as Bessie Smith, Ola Belle Reed, Blind Blake, Odetta and Dave Van Ronk. Here’s to the songs of old, may they live on forever. Find American Songcatcher, available wherever you get your podcasts.

    --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support