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  • What is the world’s longest footrace? The answer might surprise you. It doesn’t cross the Sahara desert, or follow the Iditarod trail. It takes place in Queens, NY, and covers only a tiny portion of that borough - one 883m block, to be precise.

    The Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race circles that block 5,649 times, and runners have 52 days in which to complete it. That’s the equivalent of running two marathons every day for 7 ½ weeks. Harita Davies has completed it three times, only the second woman to achieve that feat, finishing it this year in 50 days, 13 hours, 23 minutes and 14 seconds.

    “After I had that physical movement and the kind of adrenaline and everything that the team sport and just the movement brings, I would feel great, you know?”

    Harita struggled with depression as a teenager, but found relief in sports. There were times that she’d stay in bed all day, then drag herself to a 5:00 p.m. water polo match in her pajamas, thinking “God, we have to play water polo,” but within a few minutes of playing, her depression would lift. “I always remember,” she says, “how that to me was like a miracle.”

    “Having this goal is so incredibly rewarding when you achieve it.”

    Doing an Outward Bound course in her native New Zealand when she was 18 was a “huge influence” in Harita’s life. Learning how to do new things and working with others helped her find something strong within herself. The course culminated in a half marathon, and she was worried that she wouldn’t be able to complete it. When she did, “it wasn't that I thought ‘I'm going to become a runner now,’ but I was like, ‘wow, that was an accomplishment.’”

    “It was kind of a no brainer; it was like you start meditating and you start running.”

    A couple of years later,she went to a meditation class that followed the philosophy of Sri Chinmoy. He advocated athleticism, and the combination of meditation and exercise resonated with her. “I just started meditating and I started running,” she recalls, “and the two of them have been the solid points in my life… from then on, I've never had the one without the other.”

    “I really couldn't run for more than a couple of miles for quite a few years. I would just be exhausted. And so that was a really, really challenging time for me because running had always been such an important part of my happiness and my peace and my identity.”

    By 2007, Harita was running ultramarathons. After one multi-day race, she didn’t recover well, and the endometriosis from which she’d suffered for years became much worse. She was unable to run for five years, but it led to an unexpected discovery. Since she couldn’t run, she had to walk. “I was always like, I hate walking, you know, I'm someone who runs and I don't like walking,” she says, but she realized that “yeah, well maybe you need to learn to like walking.” She wound up not just liking it, but loving it.

    “We limit ourselves so much by the way we define ourselves without even really thinking that much about it.”

    The mental shift that came about when she had to stop running made her realize how “we so often put ourselves into a cage in the way that we define our happiness and what we need in our lives.”

    Despite her health issues, Harita decided to do the Sri Chinmoy Oneness Home Peace Run, the world’s largest peace torch relay. She spent three months running around the United States, and by the end of it, the endometriosis had gone away.

    “It really all came down to being happy and following my heart and following my inspiration and not being bound by what I felt like I should do or what was the right thing to do.”

    After the Peace Run, she no longer saw running as something that she needed to do, but as a blessing. In 2017, following her heart and inspiration led her to enter the 3100 Mile Race.

    At the start line, she thought, “this is outrageous; I can’t believe it’s me who’s standing here,” and says, “I was surprisingly surrendered to just having a disastrous experience my first time.” Not only was it not a disaster, she completed it and did better than she had ever imagined she would. More importantly, it made her realize that by running it, she was part of something bigger.

    It takes a huge village to put on the race, and the runner’s role, obviously, is to run. But as Harita points out, “there's no way you'd be able to do it without all these other people playing their role. And in the end that is just such a beautiful thing and that's a huge part of the beauty of this race is that we all play our roles and in the end it creates something.”

    “I felt like this in a way added almost responsibility to womankind to do my best.”

    The second and third times that Harita ran the race, she was the only woman and felt an added obligation to excel. She’d come to realize that as a woman there were elements that were very different than they were for men, but she couldn’t really identify what they were. She contacted Dr. Stacy Sims, an expert in human performance, particuarly sex differences. They worked together on Harita’s nutrition and hydration for the 2021 race, which resulted in her smashing her previous record by 20 hours and 11 minutes.

    “There's no way that I thought that I could do this and I could, so whatever your dreams are, whatever impossible fantasies in the back of your mind, just start and give it a go because you have no idea of your capacity until you try.”

    Resources:

    Tina's interview with Sanjay Rawal

    Tina's interview with Latoya Shauntay Snell

    Dr. Stacy Sims' website

    Dr. Sims' book, Roar

    Thank you to Tracksmith, UCAN, and Athletic Greens for sponsoring this episode.

    Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

    Go here and use the code TINA15, and Tracksmith will donate 5% of your purchase to Runners for Public Lands, and you'll get free shipping!

    Thank you, UCAN. I have been talking about them for years and they are my ONLY source for fueling while I am training and racing. And without fail, I have a product of UCAN every day, whether it is a Peanut Butter Chocolate Bar or their delicious Cookies and Cream Protein Powder. I am also excited to share with you a NEW product, a gel! It's fueled with Superstarch and ready to go wherever you are headed.

    Go here and use the code TINAUCAN for 20% off your order!

    AG1 is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It’s simple to make and it tastes good!

    Go here to get a FREE year’s supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Harita. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • No together run today. I explain why, and give you a few important updates I think we all need to keep in mind as we go into the holiday season. As always, honest, unedited, and real.

    Links I mentioned:

    Together runs archives Partners discount codes Gift guide with non traditional ideas
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  • Accept where you are now to get to where you want to be. Long-term fulfillment is more valuable than short-term gain. Progress is nonlinear. Those are valuable principles for runners to follow, but they’re relevant to every aspect of your life, as Brad Stulberg explains in his new book, The Practice of Groundedness.

    Everyone could benefit from practicing groundedness, but Brad’s model for success is especially pertinent for driven, type-A people, which describes many runners. Following his advice will help you become a better runner and person.

    “Many people these days… are feeling a constant coming up short in a sense of never enoughness. I call this heroic individualism and I define it as a game of one-upmanship against self and others.”

    So many people feel as though they always need to do more, achieve more. That could mean breaking a goal time in a race or getting a promotion, but whatever it is, it’s accompanied by the belief that once you achieve it, you’ll feel fulfilled. The solution to that arrival fallacy, Brad says, is what he calls “groundedness, which is a sense of strength and stability from where you are.”

    “Groundedness does not eliminate goal setting or striving or even ambition, but what it does is, it situates it so that it's more durable and sturdy because it comes from a place of enoughness.”

    Brad points to research that says that “if you play not to lose, you tend not to perform as well as playing to win... When we are feeling unmoored or frantic or like we need to do something and then we'll finally be content, generally you do that from a place of playing not to lose.” If instead you feel as though where you are right now is enough but you want to get better, then you start playing to win. That’s more likely to lead to a flow state or being in the zone, and is associated with more sustainable peak performance.

    “We often confuse excitement and ease, even though they're very different things.”

    Excitement, Brad explains, is “feeling that rush in your body of how great it's going to feel if you nail that workout in two weeks, or you PR that race... Ease, on the other hand, is what you get when you're present in the middle of a workout and your sense of self just kind of melts away because you're just flowing into the run.”

    “Excitement, if you actually feel physiologically what that's like, is a lot closer to anxiety than to happiness, whereas ease is a lot closer to happiness than anxiety.”

    Excitable runners believe that if they nail a workout, they’ll be happy all day, and they’re filled with self-doubt if they miss a workout or don’t hit their paces. A more easeful runner, Brad says, “is someone who can look at the entire process of improvement, of self discovery, of learning about themselves as a person, as an athlete, and kind of settle into the training.” He offers Eliud Kipchoge as “the ultimate embodiment of ease.”

    “Yeah, you're faster when you're lighter, but you're slower when you're on the couch with a stress fracture.”

    Being an easeful, rather than an excitable, runner can mean the difference between long-term success and burnout. The excitable approach may work for a few training cycles, but it will be unsustainable in the long term.

    “Those hits of excitement are really powerful. But if you do those things over and over and over again, you start to feel like crap.”

    Whether it’s in running or other aspects of your life, you need to learn how to not give in to the craving for excitement. Outside of running, that might mean ignoring the urge to check your phone to see if you’ve gotten an email or a “like” on your social media. Instead, work on staying grounded and present in the moment, and not allowing yourself to be distracted by the momentary high of an affirmation online.

    That doesn’t mean that you have to disconnect entirely. Brad believes that “trying to have a goal of just being present always… is really hard in the 21st century and I think you set yourself up for a lot of failure and then a lot of self judgment if you have such a goal.” Instead, set aside blocks of time when you want to be fully present, and eventually you’ll find that those blocks can get longer and longer. It may not be easy at first, but it will be worth it. As Brad says,

    “No one ever looks back and says a really happy moment was having a viral post. So I think it's really important to remember this.”

    resources:

    Brad's website

    The Practice of Groundedness: A Transformative Path to Success That Feeds--Not Crushes--Your Soul

    Brad's Twitter

    Thank you to Insidetracker, Athletic Greens, and Zencastr for sponsoring this episode.

    Have you not been feeling yourself lately? Gone down a lot of avenues but haven’t really found clear solutions? That is where InsideTracker can come in for you. I have trusted this company for years to show me where I may be lacking and if I need a few tweaks here and there. I count on InsideTracker to help me decipher the science behind it all.

    Go here to get $200 off Ultimate + Free InnerAge, or 25% off site wide!

    AG1 is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It's simple to make and it tastes good!

    Go here to get a FREE year's supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription.

    Zencastr is an all in one podcast production suite that gives you studio quality audio and video without needing all the technical know-how. I've tried all different platforms, I've tried all different types of things and I am obsessed with Zencastr. I love it. I encourage everyone I know to use it because it is just so easy.

    Go here and use the code "runningforreal" to get 30% off for the first three months!

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Brad. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Join Tina for a unique together walk (while you run) as she takes her time off running and is unable to compete in her 50k due to her children having Covid 19 (and now Tina has it too). You become Tina's therapist in this raw, vulnerable, open time together as she works through her feelings about missing her goal race becuase of her kids being sick. If this is your first together run, one of the others would be a better fit, but if you are a regular listener, or have learned to care about Tina and her journey, this together walk will be a way to connect.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun31

    Tina mentioned

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Guarina Lopez is a storyteller who uses not only words but also images to share stories of the land and indigenous communities. A member of the Pascua Yaqui tribe of Tucson, AZ, she currently resides on the present and ancestral lands of the Piscataway and Nacotchtank in Washington, D.C. She’s a runner; the founder of Native Women Ride; a writer, photographer and filmmaker; and our guest on today’s episode.

    “There's always storytelling; it's all over, you just have to listen for it.”

    As Guarina explains, “we come from storytelling traditions because a lot of times our languages weren’t translated into English for the wider populace.” When she wanted information about her heritage, she had to ask somebody, and then, she says, “I never just got an answer, I got a story.”

    Her father was a great storyteller, which, she believes, “really kind of broadened the way that I heard the words. So when I think of storytelling and language, before I write things down, oftentimes on my run I will hear the way words sound, like these words sound beautiful together, or it'll just appear in my mind.”

    “I think that I was photographing a lot of things I was trying to understand, or things that I was passionate about.”

    Guarina was already drawing and writing stories as a child, and then at age 12, she picked up a camera. Her mother was homeless for a long time, and she began taking pictures of unhoused people, “capturing stories that I was trying to figure out that ended up being related to my life.”

    She started by shooting in 35mm, but eventually switched to a heavier, medium format camera. Photographing people was harder, and she had to think about composition in a different way, so she started to photograph the land. A pivotal moment occurred when she was on a road trip through the Pacific Northwest.

    “That's when I really made the shift of the way that I think about land, and how we use it and how we see it and perceive it is different.”

    While driving through Oregon, she pulled over and “there was an abandoned lumberyard and it almost brought me to tears because I I saw all of these trees that had been killed for nothing, but they were stacked up in all these beautiful, like modern kinds of ways, just slats over slat over slat. And so there were all these gorgeous lines. And so I was at once mesmerized by the beauty of the natural shapes, and then angered, because why would you do this?”

    “It just stopped me in my tracks and I thought, this is the land fighting back. These are the trees saying, you know, ‘this is our place.’”

    Guarina moved to Washington, D.C. and was overwhelmed by the greenery and the resurgence of life of the plants there. When she goes running and comes across a tree breaking through the sidewalk, she says, “I'm just like, ‘yes!’ because that is what you do’” - even though she knows it will probably trip her up on her next run. In her daily life, she tries to create a relationship, “whether it's with the land, or the waters, or the animals.”

    “You can't just completely erase everything. That's not how Mother Nature works.”

    The U.S. and much of the world has become accustomed to extracting as much as possible from the earth. Indigenous peoples, on the other hand, believe that you “only take what you need, and then you see the natural resurgence and natural growth processes of animals and plants and the entire ecosystem.”

    “I want to tell stories and I think the stories that need to be told are the ones that have never been told.”

    Stories are told about people who have done amazing things, but as Guarina says, “if that's the only person that’s representing their particular community, it's really not representative.” We need to recognize that everyone has a unique story, that “we're all just ordinary people, but you never know what stories people have.” It’s worthwhile to learn them. That, she says, “is where you’ll find the thing you don’t know.”

    Guarina finds much of her inspiration when she’s out for a run. After the first two miles or so, she says, “stories come to mind. I start thinking about what I want to teach, what I want to write about, what I don't know about.”

    “Nature will always provide no matter where you are, and nature will never fail. You know, I will never know enough. I will never know it all. And it changes from day to day. And so my process when I go out there and run is to think about how can I make my day better, and the run, the run itself always does that for me.”

    Resources:

    Guarina's Instagram accounts:

    Guarina Paloma Lopez

    Yaqui Rain Runner

    This Native Land

    Modern Natives' Personal Regalia

    Native Women Ride

    Call Me By My Name Project

    Thank you to Tracksmith, Athletic Greens, and goodr for sponsoring this episode.

    Tracksmith is a Boston-based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

    Go here and use the code TINA15, and Tracksmith will donate 5% of your purchase to Runners for Public Lands, and you’ll get free shipping!

    AG1 is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It's simple to make and it tastes good!

    Go here to get a FREE year's supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription.

    I have been a fan of goodr for YEARS and I literally have their sunglasses all over my house. I recently had an episode with co-founder Stephen Lease where he talks about the true and real story behind his company and I appreciate him being honest with me about it. The design behind these sunglasses really takes into consideration look and comfort. They are 100% carbon neutral and a part of 1% for the Planet.

    Go here and use the code TINA for 15% off your order.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Guarina. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Join Tina for a very tired #togetherrun as she recovers post NYC marathon before her 50k next weekend. After connecting in with nature to start the run, join Tina for a body scan, senses check in, and conversation for this week's together run. While there is only one option for the run, it means we are all doing the same thing. Tina discusses the importance of recognizing when you are tired, and knowing it is okay to admit things are tough.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun30

    Tina mentioned

    Running Realized

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here:

    Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio |

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Fernanda Maciel uses ultrarunning to draw attention to environmental and social issues around the world. She’s completed the Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB) nine times, earning a spot on the podium four times and winning once; is an Ultra-Trail World Tour champion; and among other feats, holds the World Female Record for running up and down Mount Kilimanjaro.

    “In Brazil, I was always running on the trail. So my love for the waterfalls and the rivers and for the nature there was giant, so that was part of myself.”

    Fernanda studied law at university because it was her dream to become an environmental lawyer and protect nature in her home state in Brazil. She practiced law for a time, but was dismayed by the role that politics play in determining environmental policy.

    “Maybe I can do something for the environment, but being outside, being outdoors… just inspire people to be a little bit more aware about what's going on.”

    She decided that she could make a greater impact by committing herself to ultrarunning full time and bringing attention to environmental and social issues in the places where she runs. The White Flow project was born, and began with her becoming the first woman to run the Camino de Santiago de Compostela (860km in ten days), which she did to raise funds for children with cancer in Spain and Brazil.

    “I did this project in Aconcagua, running up and down the highest mountain in America, and then part of the project was also about the environment and how they recycle their rubbish in the park.”

    Fernanda had dreamed of running up and down Aconcagua, in Argentina, and in 2016 became the first woman to do so. She used the feat to learn about and share how a huge national park can manage the garbage left by visitors.

    “I think more than the win, is for me just to finish. You suffer, you learn so much, you know, when you suffer, and during this race, you learn a lot.”

    Fernanda has taken on a new challenge every year, but there’s one that she’s done multiple times - the UTMB. It starts and finishes in Chamonix, in the French Alps, and covers around 170 kilometers (106 miles), circumnavigating Mont Blanc, the highest mountain in Western Europe. Although she lives in Chamonix now, the cold conditions are still a challenge for her; as she says, “I think because I’m from Brazil, I need to train three times more than European people.” Although she’s been victorious there, there have also been times when she hasn’t finished, but she doesn’t regret them. “The victory is cool,” she says, “but I think I learned so much when I couldn’t finish.”

    This year Fernanda has had to forgo races and record-setting after suffering a brain injury in February, while belaying her boyfriend rock climbing. She’s on her way to a full recovery, and says that as a result of the accident, “I'm really connected right now much more to the universe than I was before.”

    “Just be grateful for where you are right now. I think the simple life is the most beautiful one and I wish the best for everybody. And yeah, just enjoy the mountains and the trails because this is a beautiful gift that you have.”

    Resources:

    Fernanda's website

    Fernanda's Facebook

    Fernanda's Instagram

    Fernanda's Twitter

    Running Realized: Running and Climate Change with the UN Humanitarian Office

    Running Realized: The Sustainable Road Race

    Fernanda’s video for the UN’s World Humanitarian Day

    Thank you to Athletic Greens, goodr, and Insidetracker for sponsoring this episode.

    AG1 is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It's simple to make and it tastes good!

    Go here to get a FREE year's supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription.


    I have been a fan of goodr for YEARS and I literally have their sunglasses all over my house. I recently had an episode with co-founder Stephen Lease where he talks about the true and real story behind his company and I appreciate him being honest with me about it. The design behind these sunglasses really takes into consideration look and comfort. They are 100% carbon neutral and a part of 1% for the Planet.

    Go here and use the code TINA for 15% off your order.

    Have you not been feeling yourself lately? Gone down a lot of avenues but haven’t really found clear solutions? That is where InsideTracker can come in for you. I have trusted this company for years to show me where I may be lacking and if I need a few tweaks here and there. I count on InsideTracker to help me decipher the science behind it all.

    Go here to get 25% off as a special for Running for Real listeners on their ENTIRE store.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Fernanda. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • A different take on together runs today, but equally as enjoyable. Join Tina and other runners from the community in New York as they complete a together run in Central Park the day before the TCS NYC marathon! Tina interviewed some runners in the community to have them share their story and inspire us with their journey. Feel the energy and buzz from the excitement and anticipation, and use it to rev up your run into something special.

    So join us for #togetherrun29 in New York

    Tina mentioned

    Running Realized

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Sonya Looney describes herself as a normal person who has been able to achieve extraordinary things through hard work, self-belief, determination, moxie, and grit. That includes being a World Champion mountain bike racer who has competed in over 25 countries, in places like the Sahara Desert, the Himalayas, and the Mongolian steppes. She’s also a runner, a TEDx speaker, an entrepreneur, and host of her own podcast, The Sonya Looney Show.

    “I love the ultra endurance stuff just because I feel like you really get to know who you are as a person.”

    Sonya’s mountain bike races are usually 50 - 100 miles or 24-hour races. She loves the endurance aspect, and also that “you have a lot of time out there and it's so mental, and the range of emotions that you experience in the course of a day is so diverse, and you wouldn't necessarily feel those in your daily life.”

    “If I can safely push through this thing, then that builds my confidence and my self- belief for the next time.”

    The obstacles in endurance mountain bike racing require the rider to make a choice: do I go on, or do I quit? Life, of course, is the same. As Sonya says, “you learn over time that giving up makes you give up more,” so she chooses to take on the challenges. You can look back on the hard things that you did and got through, and then “you can remember that and then you just keep going and going.”

    “Optimism is accepting the difficult things as they come up, but knowing that with effort and maybe a little bit of grit that they can get even better.”

    Sonya believes that to do those hard things, you need to train optimism. That doesn’t mean “just blindly thinking that everything is going to be fine and ignoring all the difficult things.” You need to be aware of your negative thoughts, but instead of giving into them, you can work on confronting and overcoming them.

    “The outcome isn't the most important thing about what you're doing.”

    One of the greatest fears that people have is failing to meet the expectations of others, or even harder, of ourselves. Sonya emphasizes the importance of being focused on the process, because “you're not entitled to the outcome. Like you might think, “I deserve to win’ or ‘I deserve this,’ but so does everybody else out there that's working just as hard as you, or maybe even harder than you. So really it's about being proud of your effort at the end of the day.”

    “Our lives get over complicated, focusing on all these things that we think that we need to feel good.”

    One thing that Sonya has learned through her travels in other countries is that “you don't really need that much to be happy.” There are places where people live very simply, but they’ve found a way to make it work for them. Seeing that has made her ask herself what she really needs to feel fulfilled, and to appreciate all “the basic things we take for granted.”

    “Ask yourself, what are the consequences if I don't speak up and will I regret it if I don't speak up or do the thing?”

    Sonya has chosen to compete in some smaller races in other countries because it’s important to her “to have a different lens on life,” even if that means passing up more prestigious races that could get her bigger sponsorships or more media coverage. She’s found that when you don’t follow your heart, “a lot of times you do regret it if you don't do it, and that's because it's clashing with something that you fundamentally believe in.”

    “I think a lot of us do feel like people will love us more if you achieve more.”

    Following your own path can be difficult, especially if it means doing something that you’re afraid you might not be good at, or that other people won’t approve of or understand. But Sonya believes that “if you have the courage to explore that curiosity, to just open a door or to try an opportunity that comes your way that sounds interesting, you're going to learn so much.” As she says, “it's not my quote, but be brave enough to suck at something new.”

    “Just focus on the joy of getting better, because there is a lot of fun in getting better at something, but it requires getting started, even if you're bad at it.”

    Resources:

    Sonya's website

    The Sonya Looney Show

    Tina's interview on Sonya's podcast

    Sonya's TEDx Talk

    Sonya's Instagram

    Sonya's Facebook

    Running for Real NYC Marathon Watch-Along

    Thank you to Tracksmith and Generation UCAN for sponsoring this episode.

    Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

    Go here and use the code TINA15, and Tracksmith will donate 5% of your purchase to Runners for Public Lands, and you'll get free shipping!

    Thank you, Generation UCAN. I have been talking about them for years and they are my ONLY source for fueling while I am training and racing. And without fail, I have a product of UCAN every day, whether it is a Peanut Butter Chocolate Bar or their delicious Cookies and Cream Protein Powder. I am also excited to share with you a NEW product, a gel! It's fueled with Superstarch and ready to go wherever you are headed.

    Go here and use the code TINAUCAN for 20% off your order!

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Sonya. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Together run monday! Join Tina for a 30, 45, and 60 minute connective, reflective, peaceful run. We will ground ourselves with nature, check in with our body and mind, and take in our five main senses, before having a chat. Each group finishes their run with a few strides. This is as close to running with a friend without running with a friend. We love hearing feedback and seeing you out on your together runs. Be sure to share and sign up for the watchalong this weekend!

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun28

    Tina mentioned

    Tracksmith's shakeout run

    Sign up for the Running For Real watch along

    Steve Donziger on Drilled Podcast

    Steve Donziger story

    Brett Goldstein and Brene Brown

    COP26

    Video about #thehumanrace campaign

    Running Realized

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • When you read about Jerome Foster II’s accomplishments, you’d be forgiven for assuming that he’s worked in the public sector for decades. He serves on the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council; is one of the major organizers of Fridays for Future Washington, which holds weekly climate strikes in front of the White House; helped to organize three of the largest climate marches in the Washington, D.C. area; and is the executive director of OneMillionOfUs, an international youth advocacy and voting rights organization. That would be an impressive resume for someone at the end of their career, but Jerome is only 19 years old.

    In today’s episode he talks about why he’s devoted himself to addressing the climate crisis, shares advice on how we can all take positive action, and tells why, despite all of the challenges, he’s hopeful for the future.

    “It's the system that has to change because the system is what caused the problem.”

    Small actions taken by individuals won’t solve the climate emergency; meaningful change has to come from the government and corporations. As Jerome explains, “There's the fossil industry which pays the officials to not take action and that's why we don't have climate action. It's just that the system is money in politics. And people have to understand that beyond voting, we have to also be actively aware and actively pushing our elected officials if we don't elect people that are real champions of the people.”

    “If a company makes a product, they have to be accountable to that product that they make and what happens to it.”

    Companies place the responsibility to live sustainably on the consumer, but very few people have the option to change their lifestyle in a meaningful way. It’s the companies that need to take action. It’s almost impossible to shift away from using plastic, but a company like Coca Cola could revert back to the way it used to do business, when it sold soda in returnable glass bottles.

    What consumers can do is choose companies that only create renewable products. So many companies produce one sustainable product, then use those profits towards the production of other materials that destroy the planet. Jerome advises that consumers should “tell that larger company, say Coca Cola, that until all of your products are sustainable, it doesn't matter that one of your bottles is sustainable because that one bottle is fueling the whole system.”

    “You shouldn't tell them about the scale of the climate crisis, what you should really do is tell them about how to live sustainably.”

    Jerome believes that scaring young people about the enormity of the climate crisis does more harm than good. Instead they should be taught to view sustainable living, like having solar panels on a house or driving an electric car, as the norm, and “that is how you can raise a generation that sees gas powered cars, and coal, oil, and natural gas as how my generation sees the rotary phone and sees the VHS, like it's outdated.”

    “It just feels like your future was stolen, quite honestly.”

    Previous generations have left it to young people who had no part in the destruction of the environment to repair it, while taking no responsibility themselves. As Jerome says, “I didn't reap any of the benefits that you did when you had fun making this mess. Now I have to spend all of my waking hours fixing what you did and you don't even have the respect to come back and help me clean it up. I think that what we're asking people to do is to help. We don't need apologies. We know that you may not have known back in the day when it was happening that you're making a mess. But now you know, so come and help and come be a part of this movement.”

    “The impetus to why I founded OneMillionOfUs is to have an organization that brought together all justice movements under the umbrella of voting.”

    While interning for Rep. John Lewis, Jerome realized that many social issues intersect, so why not have advocates for all of them join together? He created OneMillionOfUs to unite them, “so that whenever we organize a strike or protest or civil disobedience that immediately transitions into voting. And the slogan was ‘take it to the streets, take it to the polls’ and ‘today we strike, tomorrow we vote.’”

    Jerome says he feels the most hopeful about the future of the planet “when I'm at climate strike and going in the streets, going out with my friends and saying what needs to be done.” There’s a tremendous amount to do, but he’ll never give up.

    “I just keep pushing forward because people sent me here to fight for them So I'm going to keep on fighting no matter what.”

    resources:

    OneMillionOfUs Instagram

    OneMillionOfUs Facebook

    OneMillionOfUs GoFundMe

    Jerome's Instagram

    Thank you to InsideTracker, Beam, and Tracksmith for sponsoring this episode.

    Have you not been feeling yourself lately? Gone down a lot of avenues but haven’t really found clear solutions? That is where InsideTracker can come in for you. I have trusted this company for years to show me where I may be lacking and if I need a few tweaks here and there. I count on InsideTracker to help me decipher the science behind it all.

    Go here to get 25% off as a special for Running for Real listeners on their ENTIRE store.

    A new product that I’ve been trying out is Beam; they help athletes with balance, performance, and recovery. I’ve used “elevate energy” and “elevate balance” and the flavors were great. I felt that the hydrating electrolyte energy powder, formulated with beetroot, green coffee bean, and citrulline, really helped me and I know they will help you too.

    Go here and use code TINA for 15 % off your order or 20% off a subscription.

    Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

    Click here and when you use code TINA15, you’ll get free shipping and 5% of your order will be donated to Runners for Public Lands.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Jerome. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • It's #togetherrun time! Join Tina for a 30, 45, and 60 minute run together....while apart. We start by grounding ourselves with nature, then check in with our body and mind, followed by paying attention to five of our senses, and then have a conversation. Each group finishes their run with a few strides. Tina carries a small, handheld mic to make it be as close to running with a friend as possible...without actually doing it. We love hearing feedback and seeing you out on your together runs. Be sure to share.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun27

    Tina mentioned

    COP26

    Video about #thehumanrace campaign

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Kyle Robidoux was ready to run the Boston Marathon this year, with Tina as his guide, until fate intervened in the form of a stress fracture. Any runner would be gutted to have to DNS, and Kyle is no exception. However, he's well versed in overcoming adversity and tough situations.

    When he was eleven, he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a degenerative eye disease that can lead to blindness, and he was declared legally blind at nineteen. Today he shares the story of his journey, how he ensures that he isn’t defined by the boundaries that others place on him, and a few beer recommendations.

    “I had high cholesterol, high blood pressure in my early 30s and I knew I needed a lifestyle change.”

    In 2010 Kyle found that he got tired playing with his two year old daughter; he got tired bending over to tie his shoelaces, for that matter. He was overweight, his biomarkers were bad, and he knew he had to improve his health. He started walking, then running, gradually increasing the time he ran. He didn’t have a goal in mind, other than trying to run a few minutes longer every week.

    “When I hit two hours I said, ‘wow, when am I ever going to be able to run two hours again? I should sign up for a race.’ And that was when I signed up for my first half marathon.”

    One day, his intended 90 minute run extended to an hour and 45 minutes. He felt great, so he kept going, and when he hit two hours, he realized he was ready for a half marathon. Since then, he’s completed over 25 marathons and ultras, including five 100 milers and the grueling six-day, 120 mile Transrockies Run. Getting to that point wasn’t easy, not only in the sense of the physical training, but coming to terms with the progressive loss of his eyesight.

    “I felt angry because all these things were being taken away from me, and what I realized at the end was I was giving up on all those things that I loved and I just needed to adapt and change things up a little bit in order to continue doing them.”

    When Kyle was diagnosed with RP, doctors said that he would be totally blind by college. He and his parents talked about some aspects of the prognosis, but didn’t address the emotional impact of vision loss. And for a time, they didn’t have to. Kyle was declared legally blind at 19, but it wasn’t until his late twenties, he says, that “it really started taking things away from me that I loved, like skiing independently and playing recreational baseball and pick up leagues for baseball and softball. And I was just becoming really bitter and angry.”

    At the urging of his then girlfriend, now his wife, he started seeing a therapist. It was hard for him at first, but ultimately it helped him work through the loss and anger, and gave him tools to cope with his diminishing eyesight. Now he encourages anyone struggling emotionally to at least give therapy a try. As he says, “you don’t have to commit 100%, but if folks go once or twice, I feel like you start to see the benefits really quickly, even if it's just once a week for an hour. I think there's tremendous value in that and I certainly feel like if I would have started it earlier, it would have been much more beneficial to my overall well being, and quite possibly my physiological and physical health, in addition to my mental health.”

    “And then I asked, I'm like, ‘well, you know because I am an idiot and have an ego sometimes, what happens if I do run Boston?”

    The coping mechanisms that he’s learned through therapy are helping Kyle now, as he processes not being able to run the Boston Marathon. He’s run it the past eight or nine years, and was ready to continue that streak this year, with Tina as his guide. But shortly before race day he was diagnosed with a stress fracture in his foot, and reluctantly accepted that it would be best not to run. He could have done it, albeit painfully, but it would have resulted in having to take up to four months off from running, rather than 3 - 8 weeks. The tradeoff, he concluded, wasn’t worth it.

    Since he’s usually running Boston, he’s only spectated there once, so this year, he says, “I'm gearing myself up to get really excited to cheer.” Oh, and also to get together with friends to have a few beers and possibly fill squirt guns with Fireball to shoot at people as they walk by. Basically, he says, “I'm hoping to truly embrace the spectator side of what is so special about the Boston marathon.”

    “I would just say that anyone and everyone can be a guide.”

    Kyle runs accompanied by a guide. Guides are needed for runners of all abilities, and there’s training and support available for anyone who would like to be one. United in Stride can help you locate runners who are visually impaired in your community and connect with them. Achilles International has a list of their chapters around the country. Kyle strongly believes that “with a little bit of training and support and strong communication everyone can be a sighted guide.”

    “I tell folks also that part of being a sighted guide, it's great because you're volunteering while doing something you'd already be doing if you're an active runner, right?”

    Resources:

    Kyle's website

    Kyle's Instagram

    Kyle's Twitter

    United in Stride

    Running for Real podcast with Rich Hunter, founder of United in Stride

    Achilles International

    Thank you to goodr, Athletic Greens, and Beam for sponsoring this episode.

    I have been a fan of goodr for YEARS and I literally have their sunglasses all over my house. I recently had an episode with co-founder Stephen Lease where he tells the story behind his company and I appreciate him being honest with me about it. The design behind these sunglasses really takes into consideration look and comfort. They are 100% carbon neutral and a part of 1% for the Planet.

    Go here and use the code TINA15 for 15% off your order.

    Athletic Greens is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It’s simple to make and it tastes good!

    Go here to get a FREE year’s supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription.

    A new product that I’ve been trying out is Beam; they help athletes with balance, performance, and recovery. I’ve used “elevate energy” and “elevate balance” and the flavors were great. I felt that the hydrating electrolyte energy powder, formulated with beetroot, green coffee bean, and citrulline, really helped me and I know it will help you too.

    Go here and use code TINA for 15 % off your order or 20% off a subscription.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Kyle. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Join Tina for something really special, today these together runs are six months old and more runners are joining every week for the community, connection, and closeness to running with a friend. In this 30, 45, and 60 minute run for #togetherrun26, we connect to mother earth, complete a body scan, check in with our senses, and have a conversation. Finishing each version of the run with a few strides. Tina carries a small, handheld mic to make it be as close to running with a friend as possible...without actually doing it. We love hearing feedback and seeing you out on your together runs. Be sure to share.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun26

    Tina mentioned

    Buy Nothing Groups- see if your area has one.

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Kayleigh Williamson made history in 2017, when she became the first person with Down syndrome to run in - and complete - the Austin Half Marathon. Since then she’s finished 12 more half marathons, numerous races at other distances, and is training for her first marathon in 2022.

    She’s written a children’s book, It’s Cool To Be Me, dedicated to people with Alzheimer’s, which her late grandmother suffered from and which often occurs in people with Down syndrome. Her running journey is inspiring proof of what grit and heart can accomplish.

    “I had taken her to a doctor at 215 pounds. He looked at her and he told me,‘this, it's not gonna end well.’”

    Kayleigh was in her early 20s when her grandmother had her second stroke and soon after was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Her mother, Sandy, began researching the disease and discovered that the chance of somebody with Down syndrome developing Alzheimer's is “astronomically higher” than it is for other people. Kayleigh consumed a lot of fast food, processed food, and soda, and weighed 215 pounds. She had developed autoimmune disorders, including Graves’ disease, and Sandy knew that she had to do something to help her daughter.

    “I expected some type of rejection. And the running community, we got total acceptance and 80 pounds came off of her body and every one of her autoimmune disorders went into remission. And today I see how healthy she is.”

    Sandy initially feared that Kayleigh wouldn’t be accepted by the running community, but they embraced her. And even though she began running because of Sandy’s encouragement, it’s her own commitment that takes Kayleigh to the finish line. “I tell her she can stop if she needs to stop,” Sandy says. “ She never does. And that's the part that's kind of humbling to me whether we're training or we're in the middle of a race because she's got this determination that she just doesn't stop.”

    “You have to get to the point you don't care what the rest of the world thinks.”

    The opinion of others bothered Sandy more than it did Kayleigh. She remembers a race where they were in last place. She grabbed Kayleigh’s hand to get her to run faster, and Kayleigh jerked her hand back. At that point, Sandy realized, “It's more important for her to finish the race than what anyone else thinks about where we are in the race. And I think that's kind of the same for life.”

    “If you pick up your toys and go home, you don't influence change.”

    That isn’t to say that disregarding others’ opinions is easy. Sandy recalls a race where people were openly staring and taking pictures, and she resolved that they would never go back there. But then she realized that the situation would never improve if they just walked away, so, she says, “we have specifically decided that we're going back and we're doing those races over again until we impact that change.”

    “I think anytime you're told that your child is uniquely different in any way, you feel this need to protect them to the point that you think you're fixing it. And really it was the realization that she didn't need fixing.”

    When Kayleigh was born, Sandy was told that she should put her in an institution. Now she’s proud that her daughter can stand on her own two feet. She’s realized that “she doesn't need me protecting her, a lot of times she needs me to get out of the way.”

    Sandy raised Kayleigh to give everything her best shot. She’s done that, and succeeded.

    “Don't let somebody else tell you what you can and cannot do. Get out there and try it, and if the first time you try it and you don't succeed, but you know in your heart of hearts you can still do it, get up there and do it again as many times as you need to get back up.”

    resources:

    Kayleigh's Instagram

    Kayleigh's Facebook

    Video of Kayleigh at the Austin Half Marathon

    It's Cool To Be Me

    Thank you to Tracksmith, InsideTracker, and Beam for sponsoring this episode.

    Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

    Click here and enter code TINA15 to get $15 of your purchase of $75 or more.

    Have you not been feeling yourself lately? Gone down a lot of avenues but haven’t really found clear solutions? That is where InsideTracker can come in for you. I have trusted this company for years to show me where I may be lacking and if I need a few tweaks here and there. I count on InsideTracker to help me decipher the science behind it all.

    Go here to get 25% off as a special for Running for Real listeners on their ENTIRE store.

    A new product that I’ve been trying out is Beam; they help athletes with balance, performance, and recovery. I’ve used

    “elevate energy” and “elevate balance” and the flavors were great. I felt that the hydrating electrolyte energy powder, formulated with beetroot, green coffee bean, and citrulline, really helped me and I know they will help you too.

    Go here and use code TINA for 15% off your order or 20% off a subscription.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Kayleigh and Sandy. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Together runs are 25 today! Join Tina for #togetherrun25 around the dark St Louis suburbs. In this 30, 45, and 60 minute run, Tina carries a small, handheld mic to make it be as close to running with a friend as possible...without actually doing it. We start with a body scan, then go onto a senses check up, updates from life this week, and have a conversation. We love hearing feedback and seeing you out on your together runs. Be sure to share.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun25

    Tina mentioned

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    BUT, please fill out this survey to let the Running For Real team know what you are enjoying and what we could include more of.

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram

    Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player

    Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • Regina Lopez is a pro runner for Salomon, competed in the 2020 Olympic Trial Marathon, and won her first Spartan Trail Race. Last year she set a new 50 mile treadmill world record (8:41:37), despite never having trained for or run anything longer than a marathon and never having run longer than six miles on a treadmill.

    You’d never expect that somebody so accomplished would struggle with confidence and self-image, but she has. Today she talks about how she works through those issues, the importance of surrounding yourself with people who believe in you, and taking on the challenge of trying new things.

    Know that you are equal to them, that if you put in the work and you get in that line, you belong there, and I did belong there.

    Throughout her twenties, Regina mainly ran marathons, and it was starting to get old. “I was just doing the same thing, and just hanging out with the same people doing the same thing and I just got bored,” she recalls. She had friends who ran Spartan races and followed Courtney Dauwalter and other ultra runners, and was intrigued by the idea of running trails and longer distances.

    So she entered the Spartan Trail US Championship Women’s 21K in 2019. She hadn’t focused on trail running, and she wasn’t sponsored at the time, so seeing all of the sponsored athletes competing was a little intimidating. But, she says, “I just went in that race, I had fun. I was competitive, I raced my own race, and I won.” In 2021 she ran her first ultra, the 50K Road National Championship, and earned second place.

    I wanted to be part of something where I felt included, where I felt that it was something bigger than myself, with people who want to just grow, who are about inclusion, who are about just treating people right.

    She caught the attention of Salomon, which she believes is the perfect sponsor for her. They’re not as interested in her times as in who she is as a person. If that wasn’t the case, if she didn’t feel welcome, she wouldn’t have taken the sponsorship.

    To live a life where you’re not being acknowledged, you’re not being appreciated, you’re not doing something that’s rewarding, then why do it?

    When Covid hit, Regina realized that she wanted to be more than “just a runner.” She’d been so focused on being an athlete that she had never thought she’d have a career. She’d also never had anyone support her ambitions. Then she found her current job, which she loves, working with children with autism. Like Salomon, it feels like a community, and she has mentors to help her grow.

    When I got into running it made me feel like I was strong, like people's opinions didn't matter to me. Yeah, that's how I gained confidence and so I just put all my focus on running.

    There were many times when Regina felt alone and self-conscious. She had a speech problem and didn’t begin speaking until she was five. Ever since she was a baby, she was called “chubby.” It wasn’t intended to be mean; people thought it was cute, but it hurt.

    She was athletic, though, and played basketball and volleyball, and then got into running and weight training. All of that helped her shift her mindset and appreciate what her body can do.

    When I've been put down so much during my life, I feel like that pushes me to want to achieve that goal.

    Regina didn’t have access to a track and did all of her running workouts on the streets of Los Angeles. She didn’t have money for college tuition. But the more that people told her that she wouldn’t run competitively or go to college, the more determined she was to prove them wrong. In her senior year of high school, she went to a running camp at UCLA. She earned a college scholarship.

    When she was at the running camp, the coach told her, “keep running; we need more representation.” At first what he meant didn’t click, but then, she says, “I went to a half marathon and a woman and her daughter came up to me after the race and the mom, she said, ‘thank you so much.’ You know, ‘you're a strong Latina woman. We need more women like you.’” Now she loves giving the encouragement that she lacked when she was growing up to other young women.

    It just feels great when I know I'm making an influence. Like there's two girls, they actually went to my 50 mile treadmill race. And every time I see them, they always tell me, “you inspire me,” and it just feels great that I'm able to encourage other female young runners.

    Resources:

    Regina's Instagram

    Ecosia - the search engine that plants trees

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    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

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    "Thank you" to Regina. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • oin Tina for her first regular run back from injury. If you have experinced the paranoia of pain returning when getting back to training, you will know this well. Join Tina for this #togetherrun24 where she does a 30, 45, and 60 minute run carrying a small, handheld mic. We start with a body scan, then go onto a senses check up, updates from life this week, and have a conversation. We love hearing feedback and seeing you out on your together runs. Be sure to share.

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun24

    Tina mentioned

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    BUT, please fill out this survey to let the Running For Real team know what you are enjoying and what we could include more of.

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  • There are four cardinal virtues recognized by almost all of the world’s philosophies: courage, temperance, justice, and wisdom. Ryan Holiday examines the first in his latest book, Courage is Calling: Fortune Favors the Brave. His other books include the bestselling Stoic trilogy of The Obstacle is the Way, Ego is the Enemy, and Stillness is the Key. He has a popular newsletter and podcast, The Daily Stoic, and on top of all that, he’s a runner! On today’s episode we talk about philosophy, running, and how they intersect.

    Seneca talks about this word euthymia, which basically he defines as tranquility, but his definition is that it's when you have the sense of the path that you're on and you're not distracted by the paths that crisscross yours.

    Seneca was speaking about a basis of human life goals, but it can apply at any level, including being disciplined in your running. Years ago Ryan was out on the track when someone came alongside him, “and now all of a sudden we're racing for no reason. And I remember thinking, he has no idea how long I've been here; he has no idea how long I ran to get here. Why are we in this pointless competition with each other to prove nothing to nobody?” Ideally, we should do whatever we’re doing and not be concerned with what others are doing. Ryan says that as a runner, “just because someone else is there, just because someone comes up behind you, just because someone is twenty paces in front of you, to be able to tune that out and just focus on what you're trying to do, to me is the key part of the discipline of running.”

    The Stoics would say that anything you do out of compulsion is not good. I kind of see it as of all the things to be compulsive about, this is probably one of the least bad.

    Another discipline of running is consistency, which can slip over into compulsion. Ryan acknowledges that he’s streak-focused, but also sees it as a strength. For example, he says, “as a writer, the way you write books is by showing up every day and writing a little bit, and that adds up cumulatively to books and that's certainly how I, on a consistent basis, have published what I've been able to publish.” He likes to do some form of strenuous exercise every day, but tries to balance out his compulsion to run by biking or swimming.

    What I love about running is that it's self contained and totally in your control.

    Ryan believes that one of the things that contributes to burnout is working and “not feeling like you're making progress, not feeling like it's having an impact, not feeling like there's an end in sight, not feeling like you're progressing, not getting any sort of validation or win out of it.” Running is the opposite of that because it’s rewarding every time that you do it: “It's like you decided to run for four miles, you go run for four miles and then you come home and that's a win. And so what I love about running is that it's an easy win every day. Even the hard days are still easy compared to the rest of the world, which is so much more uncontrollable.”

    The courage to be oneself, to be difficult, to be unusual, to transgress norms or expectations, is just as scary and just as important in the long run as any form of physical courage might be.

    People tend to think of courage in terms of physical feats, but it’s also “when you put yourself out there, when you do what needs to be done despite the fact that it's scary or hard or risky.” Ryan tells a story about Margaret Thatcher, who went for her first job interview after university and saw a note that the interviewer had written, saying that she had far too much personality to work there. That’s true, Ryan says, she did have too much personality for the job, “but she was courageous enough not to become what she needed to be to work there.”

    There are two kinds of plagues. There's the one that destroys your life and then there's the one that destroys your character.

    That’s one of Ryan’s favorite quotes from Marcus Aurelius, who lived during a time of plague. It was only during the current pandemic that Ryan realized that quotes like that one, which he had thought were purely figurative, were literal, as well. Now, he says, it’s “like, oh I see what you're saying. Yes, you can get Covid. Or you can get infected with something worse than Covid, which is whatever is making these people scream at grocery store employees or take horse dewormer, you know, whatever. You can get infected with a different kind of disease, a different virus. It's actually worse because it makes you worse as a person. It might not have the same health concerns. But it's almost worse.”

    One of the things that I love about Stoicism is that it's a philosophy that articulates really clearly what our obligations are to other people. For me, the idea that stoicism is this sort of insular personal philosophy really misses what was actually a philosophy designed to make one active in the world.

    Resources:

    Ryan's website

    The Daily Stoic

    Ryan's Facebook

    Ryan's Instagram

    Ryan's Twitter

    Thank you to Tracksmith, Generation UCAN, and InsideTracker for sponsoring this episode.

    Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites!

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    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone. Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people.

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe? You can find out here.

    "Thank you" to Ryan. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

  • Tina carries a small handheld mic as she does a 30, 45, and 60 minute run with the community. Join in for a body scan, senses check up, updates from life this week (including talking throguh a small injury), and a conversation. This week we talk about small things that can be done environmentally to add into life...although, as you will hear, it is not quite that simple(!). There is a reason these together runs are very popular, give it a try and join in!

    Part meditation, part reflection, part check-in, join Tina for #togetherrun23

    Be sure to let us know if you would like to attend the Boston meetup on October 10 by emailing Tina

    Tina mentioned

    No sponsors today, trying to keep this authentic and like really running with a friend. If you want to support Tina and the Running For Real team:

    Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here.

    You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs.

    You can leave a review on iTunes.

    Thanks for listening!

    We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us:

    Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people

    Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here.

    Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts.