Avsnitt

  • In this episode we return to part two of our discussion with Monash University researcher and podiatrist Associate Professor Cylie Williams. Hosted by Luke Perraton.

    Cylie talks about her special interest area, idiopathic toe walking in kids. We learn that idiopathic toe walking is a diagnosis of exclusion and Cylie gives a summary of some of the other serious conditions that should be excluded prior to diagnosing the condition. We also talk about other important research Cylie completed during her NHMRC fellowship related to wound care.

    This is Cylie’s paper that was mentioned in the episode:

    Williams, C. M., Tinley, P., & Curtin, M. (2010). The Toe Walking Tool: a novel method for assessing idiopathic toe walking children. Gait & posture, 32(4), 508-511.

    Monash university supervisor connect: Find a research supervisor!

    About Cylie:

    Cylie has a special interest in idiopathic toe walking in children and has published extensively in paediatric, gait and health-services research.

    Cylie is a highly experienced podiatrist and Associate Professor in the School of Primary and Allied Health Care at Monash University with more than 25 years’ experience in paediatric podiatry and podiatry research.

    Cylie’s PhD investigated idiopathic toe walking in children and she also has a Master’s degree in Health Education and Promotion. Cylie works clinically at the Kingston foot clinic in Melbourne, Australia, is a senior researcher at Peninsula Health in Melbourne as well as an adjunct researcher positions with the University of South Australia and Staffordshire university in the UK. Cylie also supervises a number of PhD students, runs her own research projects and is active on social media helping to translate and disseminate research findings to clinicians.

    Connect with Cylie:

    cylie.williams@monash.edu

    @CyliePaedspod

    Connect with the Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit on Twitter:

    @MonashMRU,

    @LukePerrraton

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  • Don’t be put off by the title. This is a fascinating conversation between MMRU's Pat Vallance and digital health researcher and physiotherapist Dr Mark Merolli.

    It is also a really timely conversation with many musculoskeletal practitioners jumping into the deep end with one or more aspects of digital health over the last 12 months, many for the first time.

    Dr Mark Merolli is a senior lecturer/research fellow in the Centre for Health, Exercise, and Sports Medicine (CHESM) and department of physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne and a senior physiotherapist at Complete Sports Care in Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia.

    Mark provides us with an overview and definition of digital health and the many forms it takes, how we can appraise the quality of digital health tools and how clinicians can embrace but also understand the limitations of new technology.

    If you enjoy the episode please share via social media or to a friend or colleague.

    Connect with Mark on Twitter: @merollim

    Connect with the Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit on Twitter: @MonashMRU, @Pat_Vallance

    Don’t forget to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts from for updates on new MMRU podcast episodes.

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  • In this episode we spoke to Dr Neal Millar, Orthopaedic Surgeon and researcher at the University of Glasgow, and Dr Paul Kirwan, Physiotherapist and researcher with expertise in rheumatology and tendinopathy/sports about their recent publication in Nature Reviews called Tendinopathy.

    This is a not-to-be-missed episode for anyone interested in tendons and tendinopathy research. Neal and Paul provide an overview to the rationale for the paper, a broad discussion of contributing factors for tendinopathy and insights for individualised application of interventions for people with tendinopathy - including a few controversies.

    About Neal and Paul:

    Dr Neal Millar is an Academic Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon and researcher at the University of Glasgow specialising in shoulder surgery and the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy. He runs a specialist tendon clinic in the NHS focussed on improving the treatment of tendinopathy.

    Dr Paul Kirwan is a Physiotherapist at Connolly Hospital in Dublin, Clinical Research Fellow at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and Physiotherapist to Bohemian Football Club @bfcdublin. He has a PhD in tendinopathy and specialises in tendinopathy in his clinical practice.

    Connect with Neal and Paul on Twitter:

    Neal: @TendonGlasgowPaul: @pdkirwan Paper reference: Millar, N.L., Silbernagel, K.G., Thorborg, K., Kirwan, P.D., Galatz, L.M., Abrams, G.D., Murrell, G.A., McInnes, I.B. and Rodeo, S.A., 2021. Tendinopathy. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 7(1), pp.1-21.

    If you enjoy the episode please share widely to help us get this information out to people who need to hear it.

    Connect with the Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit:

    @MonashMRU

    @DrPeteMalliaras

    @JoshNaunton

    @Trevail

  • In this episode, Luke Perraton talks to Monash University researcher and podiatrist Associate Professor Cylie Williams about podiatry research, idiopathic toe walking in kids, why equal access to podiatry is so important for all, how/why podiatrists and other MSK clinicians can/should get involved in research and how to stay up to date with research as a clinician.

    This is a really interesting discussion. If you are a clinician who is interested in getting involved in research, staying up to date with research or just learning about the wonderful world of podiatry research, this episode is for you.

    About Cylie:

    Cylie has a special interest in idiopathic toe walking in children and has published extensively in paediatric, gait and health-services research.

    Cylie is a highly experienced podiatrist and Associate Professor in the School of Primary and Allied Health Care at Monash University with more than 25 year’s experience in paediatric podiatry and podiatry research.

    Cylie’s PhD investigated idiopathic toe walking in children and she also has a Master’s degree in Health Education and Promotion. Cylie works clinically at the Kingston foot clinic in Melbourne, Australia, is a senior researcher at Peninsula Health in Melbourne as well as an adjunct researcher positions with the University of South Australia and Staffordshire university in the UK. Cylie also supervises a number of PhD students, runs her own research projects and is active on social media helping to translate and disseminate research findings to clinicians.

    Connect with Cylie:

    cylie.williams@monash.edu

    @CyliePaedspod

    Connect with Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit:

    @MonashMRU

    @LukePerrraton

    If you found this episode interesting or helpful please share with other people and subscribe so you don't miss future episodes.

  • On this episode we were joined by Mick Hughes, exercise physiologist and sports and exercise physiotherapist from Melbourne, Australia.

    Mick spoke about his experiences in research translation for clinicians via social media and courses. It was a really interesting discussion that will be of interest to many musculoskeletal clinicians and researchers. Enjoy!

    Read Mick's blog

    Explore ACL courses via Learn.Physio

    Follow Mick:

    Twitter

    Facebook

    Instagram

    YouTube

    Linked In

    Connect with Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit

    @MonashMRU

    @LukePerraton

  • Associate Professor Peter Malliaras is a physiotherapist and leading researcher with expertise in tendinopathy. Peter has lead a number of clinical trials to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions for people with musculoskeletal conditions.

    In this episode, Luke and Pat interview Peter to learn more about bias and confounding in research and how to appreciate and understand uncertainty in science.

    Examples of biases and confoundingSelection, performance, observation, detection and attrition bias in clinical trialsOther factors that can explain outcomes of treatment and clinical trials - specific and non-specific treatment effectsWhy all of this matters to researchers, clinicians and patients

    Follow us on Twitter:

    @MonashMRU

    @drpetemalliaras

    @pat_vallance

    @lukeperraton

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com

  • Pat Vallance is a physiotherapist and PhD candidate at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Pat is also a part of the @MonashMRU podcast team.

    In this episode Luke and Peter chat to Pat about one of the publications coming out of his PhD research that explored the relationship between self-reported pain and pain during heel raise and hopping tests in people with Achilles tendinopathy - see full reference below.

    Follow us on Twitter:

    @MonashMRU

    @Pat_Vallance

    Support us by sharing or leaving a review

    Resources:

    Vallance, P., Hasani, F., Crowley, L., & Malliaras, P. (2020). Self-reported pain with single leg heel raise or single leg hop offer distinct information as measures of severity in men with midportion and insertional Achilles tendinopathy: An observational cross-sectional study. Physical Therapy in Sport, 47, 23-31.

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com

  • In this episode, Peter is joined by Josh Naunton to discuss research for exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Josh is a physiotherapist and PhD candidate with a special interest in shoulder pain and rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Peter and Josh discuss two recently published systematic reviews that they led, both of which investigate exercise prescription parameters for rotator cuff-related shoulder pain.

    Both systematic reviews led to a lot of new questions - we will return to these questions in future episodes.

    Follow us on Twitter

    @MonashMRU

    @JoshNaunton

    @drpetemalliaras

    Resources:

    Naunton, J., Street, G., Littlewood, C., Haines, T., & Malliaras, P. (2020). Effectiveness of progressive and resisted and non-progressive or non-resisted exercise in rotator cuff related shoulder pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Clinical Rehabilitation, 34(9), 1198-1216.

    Malliaras, P., Johnston, R., Street, G., Littlewood, C., Bennell, K., Haines, T., & Buchbinder, R. (2020). The efficacy of higher versus lower dose exercise in rotator cuff tendinopathy: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com

  • Every good conversation starts with an introduction, and getting everyone's names right...

    In the second MMRU discussion episode, Peter and Luke discuss the ICON 2019 consensus statement on clinical terminology in tendinopathy published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

    Why is it important that researchers, clinicians and patients use consistent terminology for tendinopathy (all for all conditions for that matter)?What was it like being a part of the development of an international consensus statement?What methods are used for a consensus statement?What were the recommendations and what's next?

    Follow us on Twitter

    @MonashMRU

    @lukeperraton

    @drpetemalliaras

    Resources:

    Scott, A., Squier, K., Alfredson, H., Bahr, R., Cook, J. L., Coombes, B., ... & Zwerver, J. (2020). Icon 2019: International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus: Clinical Terminology. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 54(5), 260-262.

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com

  • There is a saying... don't guess, assess.

    But what are the most important things to measure for people with tendinopathy?

    In the first MMRU podcast conversation, Peter Malliaras and Luke Perraton discuss the nine core health-related domains for tendinopathy as determined by the 2019 International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus (ICON) consensus group and Delphi study.

    The conversation summarises the methods and findings of the study, the core domains and other important outcome measures in tendinopathy.

    The nine core domains were:

    Patient rating of conditionParticipation in life activities (day to day, work, sport)Pain on activity/loadingFunctionPsychological factorsPhysical function capacityDisabilityQuality of lifePain over a specified time

    Follow us on Twitter

    @MonashMRU

    @lukeperraton

    @drpetemalliaras

    Resources:

    Vicenzino, B., de Vos, R. J., Alfredson, H., Bahr, R., Cook, J. L., Coombes, B. K., ... & Zwerver, J. (2020). ICON 2019—International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus: There are nine core health-related domains for tendinopathy (CORE DOMAINS): Delphi study of healthcare professionals and patients. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 54(8), 444-451.

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com

  • Welcome to the Monash Musculoskeletal Research Unit podcast hosted by Dr Luke Perraton; @lukeperraton, Associate Professor Peter Malliaras @drpetemalliaras and the @MonashMRU team.

    Tune in for an insiders view on a variety of musculoskeletal research topics including methodology, critical appraisal, interpretation and clinical application of findings.

    Join the discussion, follow us on Twitter:

    @MonashMRU

    Podcast cover, music and bumper by Kate Vallance, Content Creator, Freelance. E: hooroocreative@gmail.com