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  • Speaker(s): Ambassador Dr Jesus Seade, Sir Vince Cable, Dr Swati Dhingra, Piroska Nagy Mohacsi | The selection of the World Trade Organization's new Director General presents an opportunity for reform, but it could also result in a further weakening of the institution. Nominations for the position have just closed. LSE is organising a mini-series of presentations and discussions with the candidates. The first of the candidates to present their vision for globalisation, trade and the WTO will be Dr Jesus Seade, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico and Mexico’s chief negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA) which came into force on July 1 this year. Multilateral institutions are increasingly being challenged in recent years. One important criticism is that leaders for these organisations are not selected in a competitive and transparent manner. Promoting a stronger selection process should help enhance the legitimacy of these institutions. Calls for change have been particularly strong at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the global body dealing with the rules of trade between nations. Vince Cable (@vincecable) is Professor in Practice at the Institute of Global Affairs, LSE. Sir Vince is the former Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (2010-2015) and represented the constituency of Twickenham as a Liberal Democrat MP and was party leader from 2017-19. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the LSE, researching globalisation and industrial policy. Jesus Seade (@JesusSeade) is a candidate for WTO Director-General; Chief Negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA); and Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director, Institute of Global Affairs at the LSE School of Public Policy. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE. He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Speaker(s): Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu, Professor Lea Ypi | Recent elections in the advanced western democracies have undermined the basic foundations of political systems that had previously beaten back all challenges-from both the left and the right. The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified the backlash, further destabilising an already fragile political order. Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu and Lea Ypi discuss their recent research about the political and economic causes of this turbulence and consider ways out of the impasse. Eric Lonergan (@ericlonners) is is a macro hedge fund manager, economist, and co-author of Angrynomics. Martin Sandbu (@MESandbu) is European Economics Commentator for the Financial Times and author of The Economics of Belonging. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory in the LSE Department of Government. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Professor of Comparative Politics in the LSE Department of Government and author of Anti-System Politics. You can order the books, The Economics of Belonging by Martin Sandbu, Angrynomics by Eric Lonergan and Anti-System Politics by Jonathan Hopkin (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPoliticalSystems

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  • Speaker(s): Stephanie Flanders, Professor Stephen Machin, Dr Gemma Tetlow | The UK government’s response to COVID-19 has seen sudden growth in public spending accompanied by a sharp fall in tax receipts. Public sector borrowing may exceed £300bn in 2020-21, with the UK’s national debt exceeding annual GDP for the first time for decades. What short-term stimuli might the Chancellor now employ to re-start growth? Can the government imaginably return to austerity policies? Will inequality have increased? Is this the time for a new approach to economic management? Can the economy go back to normal and grow if social distancing restrictions persist? Is the UK out of line with comparable countries? And what about Brexit? The panel will consider these issues and more. Stephanie Flanders (@MyStephanomics) has been Senior Executive Editor for Economics at Bloomberg News and head of Bloomberg Economics since October 2017. She was previously Chief Market Strategist for Europe at J P Morgan Asset Management in London (2013-17) and both BBC Economics Editor and BBC Newsnight’s Economics Editor (2002-13). Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, has been President of the European Association of Labour Economists, is a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and was an independent member of the UK Low Pay Commission from 2007-14. He has researched extensively in various areas of empirical economics, including current research interests in the areas of labour market inequality, social mobility, the economics of education and the economics of crime. Gemma Tetlow (@gemmatetlow) is Chief Economist at the Institute for Government. Between 2016 and 2018, Gemma was Economics Correspondent at the Financial Times, reporting on and analysing economic developments in the UK and globally. Before that, she led the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ work on public finances and pensions. She has a PhD in economics from University College London. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Speaker(s): Mma Amara Ekeruche, Professor Anna Gelpern, Eric LeCompte, Dr Shirley Yu, Dr David Luke | The COVID-19 pandemic has decimated government fiscal policies across the globe, and economies worldwide are heading into historic recessions. Countries’ capabilities to address new challenges are increasingly stretched, yet efforts to tackle a health crisis in a globalised world remain highly interconnected. As low-income countries struggle to provide robust spending plans to support the population, calls have risen for the implementation of immediate debt relief from bilateral, multilateral and private creditors to African countries. Africa’s external debt payments have almost doubled in recent years, forming the backdrop of a reoccurring conversation around the debt’s sustainability at a time when money is urgently needed for domestic investments. Now the COVID-19 pandemic makes this discussion more urgent than ever. Multilateral institutions such as the IMF have recently announced sweeping debt relief packages for the continent, with the intention of facilitating governments to address the impact of the pandemic. However, questions remain on whether soliciting debt relief packages for the continent will be enough to sufficiently mitigate the worst effects of the pandemic, and if debt relief is pursued, then how should this be managed and under what conditions? Experts on foreign direct investment, development economics, international finance and macroeconomics will share their analysis of the situation in the face of the current crisis. Mma Amara Ekeruche (@Mmakeruch) is a Research Associate at CSEA. She holds a Masters in Economic Policy from University College London (UCL), United Kingdom and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. Anna Gelpern is a nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, is professor of law and Agnes N. Williams Research Professor at Georgetown University. Eric LeCompte (@Eric_LeCompte) is an American commentator on politics, finance and religion. He serves on a working group with the UN Conference on Trade and Development. He is the current executive director of Jubilee USA Network. Shirley Yu (@shirleyzeyu) is Senior Visiting Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE and an Asia fellow with the Ash Center of Harvard Kennedy School. She has a Ph.D. in political economy from China’s Peking University, and a Master’s degree in Government from Harvard University. She has published three books in Chinese, including On China, by Ambassadors, and the Rise of the RMB and the Fall of the Yen. She also served as mentor for Cherie Blair’s Foundation for International Women. David Luke (@DavidLukeTrade) is coordinator of the African Trade Policy Centre at the UN Economic Commission for Africa with the rank of a director at the Commission. He is responsible for leading ECA's research, policy advisory services, training and capacity development on inclusive trade policies and in particular the boosting intra-African trade and the continental free trade area initiatives. Prior to joining ECA in 2014, he served as UNDP trade policy adviser in Southern Africa and Geneva and also as Senior Economist and Chief of Trade at the Organization for African Unity/African Union Commission, and as an Associate Professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, and is a Professor in Development Anthropology in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

  • Speaker(s): Dr Stephen L. Roberts, Dr Leeza Osipenko, Professor Barbara Prainsack, Dr James Somauroo | With more and more information about us available electronically and online, this episode of LSE IQ asks, ‘Is big data good for our health?’ Advances in bio-medical technologies, along with electronic health records and the information we generate through our mobile phones, Smart Watches or Fit bits, our social media posts and search engine queries, mean that there is a torrent of information about our bodies, our health and our diseases out there. Alongside this, the tremendous growth in computing power and data storage means that this ‘Big Data’ can be stored and aggregated and then analysed by sophisticated algorithms for connections, comparisons and insights. The promise of all of this is that big data will create opportunities for medical breakthroughs, help tailor medical interventions to us as individuals and create technologies that will speed up and improve healthcare. And, of course, during the COVID-19 pandemic we’ve also seen some countries use data, generated from people’s mobile phones, to track and trace the disease. All of this poses opportunities for the tech giants and others who want to be part of the goldrush for our data - and to then sell solutions back to us What are the risks in handing over our most personal data? Will it allow big data to deliver on its hype? And is it a fair exchange? In this episode, Oliver Johnson speaks to Dr Leeza Osipenko, Senior Lecturer in Practice in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; Professor Barbara Prainsack, Professor of Comparative Policy Analysis at the University of Vienna and Professor Sociology at King’s College London; Dr Stephen L. Roberts, LSE Fellow in Global Health Policy in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; and Dr James Somauroo, founder of the healthtech agency somX and presenter of The Health-Tech Podcast.

  • Speaker(s): Dr Eric Parrado Herrera, Dr Victoria Nuguer, Dr Andrew Powell, Professor Andrés Velasco, Brian Wynter | The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, is taking a huge toll across the world, and governments in Latin America and the Caribbean are taking aggressive measures to save lives. Within a matter of weeks, the macroeconomic outlook for the region has changed dramatically. Financing costs have risen, commodities fallen, and large losses of GDP now seem unavoidable. However, the self-imposed partial closure of the economy is anything but a normal recession, and typical countercyclical demand management, both fiscal and monetary, is likely to be inconducive. Introduced by LSE Director Dame Minouche Shafik, a panel from the IDB and LSE will discuss the 2020 Latin American and Caribbean Macroeconomic Report and its diagnosis of a rapidly changing environment and policy recommendations aimed to bring relief, maintain economic stability, and keep the core of the economy intact. Eric Parrado Herrera is Chief Economist and General Manager of the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) since March 2019. Before joining the IDB, he was a professor of economics and finance at the ESE Business School of the Universidad de los Andes in Santiago, Chile. Victoria Nuguer is a Senior Researcher in the Inter-American Development Bank’s Research Department. She holds a Ph.D. from École Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne in Switzerland and a bachelor’s degree from the Universidad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. Prior to joining the Bank in May 2017, she spent nearly three years as a Research Economist in the Bank of Mexico. Andrew Powell (@AndyPowell_IDB) is the Principal Advisor in the Research Department (RES) at the Inter-American Development Bank. He holds a Ba, MPhil. and DPhil. (PhD) from the University of Oxford, was Lecturer at Queen Mary’s College, London and at the University of Warwick, was Chief Economist of the Central Bank of the Republic of Argentina and Professor at the Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2017-18 he was a member of the G20 Eminent Persons Group. Brian Wynter is a company director and consultant. A proud graduate of LSE and Columbia University’s SIPA with financial markets experience in the private sector and the IMF’s Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre, he was the founding CEO of Jamaica’s Financial Services Commission and, most recently, Governor of Jamaica’s central bank. Gareth Jones is Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre at LSE. He is Professor of Urban Geography in the Department of Geography and Environment at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Malcolm Geere, Inter-American Development Bank Executive Director for the United Kingdom will also speak at the beginning of the event. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@lse_lacc) is the focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Speaker(s): Sir Ronald Cohen | Envision a world that moves in only one direction: forward. A world where inequality is shrinking. Where natural resources are regenerated, and people can unlock their full potential and benefit from shared prosperity. A world focused not only on minimizing harm, but on doing measurable good. Join us for this talk by Sir Ronald Cohen about his new book, Impact: Reshaping Capitalism to Drive Real Change. Ronald Cohen (@sirronniecohen) is a philanthropist, venture capitalist, private equity investor, and social innovator, who is driving forward the global Impact Revolution. For nearly two decades, his initiatives have catalyzed global efforts to drive private capital to serve social and environmental good. He serves as Chairman of the Global Steering Group for Impact Investment and The Portland Trust. He is a co-founder of Social Finance UK, USA, and Israel; and co-founder Chair of Bridges Fund Management and former co-founding Chair of Big Society Capital. He chaired the G8 Social Impact Investment Taskforce (2013-2015), the UK Social Investment Task Force (2000-2010) and the UK’s Commission on Unclaimed Assets (2005-2007). You can order the book, Impact: Reshaping Capitalism to Drive Real Change, from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Orders from Pages can only be delivered to UK addresses. Viewers who are not based in the UK can order the book here. Nava Ashraf (@profnavaashraf) is Professor in the Department of Economics and Research Director at the Marshall Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). As the Research Director she leads the Marshall Institute’s effort to imbue private action for the public good with the science that illuminates how to maximise its impact. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening.

  • Speaker(s): Irum Ahsan, Michael Burger, Lord Carnwath, Dr Joana Setzer, James Thornton | Climate litigation has been used as a strategic tool to advance climate policy goals for at least three decades. As the number of cases addressing the causes and consequences of climate change and the public interest in such litigation has increased, so has public interest in such litigation. Today, climate litigation is widely considered to be a governance mechanism to address climate change. In this webinar, a panel of experts and practitioners will discuss the extent to which climate change litigation is driving governments to adopt more ambitious climate policies and inducing a change of behaviour among major GHG emitting corporations. The panel will also explore potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on future litigation cases. Irum Ahsan is Principal Counsel, Law and Policy Reform in the Office of the General Counsel at the Asian Development Bank. Michael Burger (@ProfBurger) is Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. Robert Carnwath is a former Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE. James Thornton (@JamesThorntonCE) is Chief Executive Officer of ClientEarth and Visiting Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. Robert Falkner (@robert_falkner) is Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation

  • Contributor(s): Professor Leah Wright Rigueur | On the 5th of March 2020, Professor Leah Wright Rigueur joined the LSE US Centre for the event “African Americans in a 'White' House: Presidential Politics, Race, and The Pursuit of Power.” At the event, using one of the most outrageous scandals in modern American political history as a case study - the Housing and Urban Development Scandal (HUD) of the 1980s and 1990s which saw political officials steal billions in federal funding set aside for low-income housing residents – Professor Leah Wright Rigueur told the complex story of the transformation of Black politics and the astonishing racial politics of presidential administrations that have paved the way for patterns of political misconduct that have continued into the present. This seminar was chaired by Professor Imaobong Umoren, Assistant Professor at the Department of International History at LSE. The event was part of the 'Race and Gender in US Politics in Historical and Contemporary Perspective' seminar series organized by the LSE United States Centre. Professor Leah Wright Rigueur is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harry S. Truman Associate Professor of American History at Brandeis University. She is the author of The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power and is currently working on the book manuscript Mourning in America: Black Men in a White House. You can also find audio of a one-on-one conversation with Professor Wright Rigueur on this feed. Contributors: Professor Leah Wright Rigueur (Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harry S. Truman Associate Professor of American History at Brandeis University); Professor Imaobong Umoren (Assistant Professor at the Department of International History at LSE)

  • Speaker(s): Valeria Gontareva, Khalid Janahi, Vali R. Nasr, Lindiwe Mazibuko, Andrés Velasco | The Closing Plenary draws out critical lessons from the breadth of the day’s discussions, to identify the leadership and cross-sectoral collaboration required to address the intersecting impacts of COVID-19 with complex global challenges everywhere. Building on insights from the thematic and geographic sessions, the Maryam Student Leaders will challenge the panel of policymakers, academics and business representatives on the transformative policy solutions needed globally. Together they will chart a path towards evidence-based and accountable leadership - the kind of leadership which will enable and accelerate a sustainable and inclusive recovery in all regions of the world. Valeria Gontareva served as the Governor of the National Bank of Ukraine in 2014-2017. She was the first woman to lead Ukraine’s central bank and oversaw vital reforms to implement a new monetary policy of inflation targeting and flexible exchange rate regime, to clean up Ukraine’s banking sector, strengthen regulatory supervision, and ensure the independence of the National Bank. Khalid Janahi is currently Chairman of Vision 3, with a focus on venture and infrastructure. He holds 38 years experience in banking and financial services, including serving as Group CEO of Dar Al-Maal Al-Islami Trust, Chairman of Faisal Private Bank, Ithmaar Bank and Solidarity Co. Vali R. Nasr (@vali_nasr) is the Majid Khadduri Professor of International Affairs and Middle East Studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of various books, including The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat, plus numerous articles in scholarly journals. Lindiwe Mazibuko (@LindiMazibuko) is the Co-founder and Executive Director of the Apolitical Foundation. She has served as Former Shadow Deputy Minister for Communications, Shadow Minister for Rural Development and Land Reform and Parliamentary Leader and Leader of the Official Opposition in South Africa. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy.

  • Speaker(s): Rutger Bregman | It's a belief that unites the left and right, psychologists and philosophers, writers and historians. It drives the headlines and the laws that touch our lives. Human beings, we're taught, are by nature selfish and governed by self-interest. In his new book, which he will talk about at this event, Rutger Bregman shows us that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. By thinking the worst of others, we bring out the worst in our politics and economics too. Rutger Bregman (@rcbregman) is a historian and author. He has published five books on history, philosophy, and economics. His book Utopia for Realists was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated in 32 languages. Bregman has twice been nominated for the prestigious European Press Prize for his work at The Correspondent. His new book is Humankind: A Hopeful History. Dr. Poornima Paidipaty is an LSE Fellow in Inequalities. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University. Her work examines the intersections of decolonisation, governance and modern social science. She helped lead and organize the Measures of Inequality project at Cambridge University, which explores how metrics and statistical frameworks have been central to our historical and political understanding of equality and fairness. Prior to the LSE, Dr. Paidipaty was the Philomathia Fellow in History at Cambridge and a member of the Society of Fellows at the University of Chicago. You can order the book, Humankind: A Hopeful History, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change.

  • Speaker(s): Professor Kehinde Andrews, Dr Miqdad Asaria, Professor Lucinda Platt, Ross Warwick, Professor Heidi Mirza | There is increasing concern that people from ethnic minority backgrounds are being disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 in England. Over the first few weeks of the pandemic there were several anecdotal reports to suggest that there are many more cases of, hospitalisations for, and deaths due to COVID-19 than we would expect from minorities’ population shares. Drawing on new IFS research, the panel will discuss the reasons why mortality is disproportionately high for minority groups, present evidence on how some minority groups are disproportionately affected by the economic impacts of the lockdown, and recommend ways forward to limit further differential social and economic consequences. Kehinde Andrews (@kehinde_andrews) is Professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University. Kehinde is an academic, activist and author whose books include Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century. His first book was Resisting Racism: Race, Inequality and the Black Supplementary School Movement. Miqdad Asaria (@miqedup) is a health economist with extensive experience in both academic and policy making settings. His research interests include health inequalities and health financing. His research in the COVID-19 space relates to the disproportionate effect among the BAME community. Lucinda Platt (@PlattLucinda) is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research focuses on inequalities, particularly those relating to ethnicity and migration, gender and disability, and she has published widely in those areas. She is a panel member of the IFS Deaton Inequality Review. Ross Warwick is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) and is contributing to the IFS Deaton Inequality Review. He joined the IFS in 2016 and works in the Centre for Tax Analysis in Developing Countries. Heidi Safia Mirza (@HeidiMirza) is Emeritus Professor of Equalities Studies, UCL Institute of Education and Visiting Professor of Race, Faith and Culture at Goldsmith’s College, University of London. She is known for her pioneering intersectional research on race, gender and identity in education. A daughter of the Windrush generation and one of the first women of colour professors in Britain, Heidi is a leading voice in the global debate on decolonisation and co-edited the flagship book, ‘Dismantling Race in Higher Education: Racism, whiteness and decolonising the academy’. She is currently co-authoring ‘Race and Ethnicity’ for the IFS Deaton Inequality Review which includes the impact of COVID-19 on Black and minority ethnic communities. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy.

  • Speaker(s): Professor George Gerapetritis, Professor Bo Rothstein, Professor Amy Verdun | From strict lockdowns and school shutdowns to fostering self-responsibility, governments have taken different paths to fight the pandemic. Some of these differences seem consistent with different national traditions or cultural frames. Yet, governments have also achieved very different results in managing the pandemic that contradict images of government performance. What should we make of this? Are our stereotypes wrong? At the same time, the economic impact of the pandemic seems to be transforming assumptions about fiscal discipline and the role of the state in the economy. Are we converging around a new activism for the state? Are we sharing a paradigmatic shift? Are north-south differences in Europe disappearing? What should we expect of our governments now? George Gerapetritis is the Minister of State, Hellenic Republic. He is a Professor of Constitutional Law at the Faculty of Law of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied in Athens (LL.B.), Edinburgh (LL.M.) and Oxford (D.Phil), has been a visiting fellow at the University of Oxford and the Hellenic Observatory, LSE. He has taught European and comparative constitutional law and history in many universities worldwide. He has published 8 books and more than 100 articles in 3 languages. Bo Rothstein holds the August Röhss Chair in Political Science at University of Gothenburg and is the co-founder of the Quality of Government (QoG) Institute at this department. Rothstein took his PhD in Political Science at Lund University (1986). Prior to the above appointment he worked a researcher at the Department of Government at Uppsala University. During 2016 and 2017 he served as Professor of Government and Public Policy at University of Oxford. Amy Verdun (@Amy_Verdun) is Professor in European Politics and Political Economy, Leiden University. Prior to this appointment she was for 21 years in the Department of Political Science of the University of Victoria (UVic), BC Canada where she was Full Professor since 2005. At UVic she served as Founder and Director of the European Studies Program (1997-2005); Graduate Advisor (2007-2009); and as Chair (Head) of the Department (2010-2013). Her research deals with European integration, governance and policy-making, political economy, as well as comparisons between the EU and Canada. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. He has held visiting positions at the University of Minnesota; New York University; Harvard University; and, the European University Institute (Firenze). Before LSE, he held academic posts at the Universities of Stirling and Bradford. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Dr Meredith Crowley, Dr Adam Marshall, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Tony Travers | In the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. This expert panel will assess where we are with the negotiations and where we might be heading. Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Meredith Crowley (@MeredithCrowle1) is a Reader in International Economics at the University of Cambridge, a Senior Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe (UKCE) and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR - London). Adam Marshall (@BCCAdam) is Director General of British Chambers of Commerce. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Speaker(s): Dr Arjan Gjonça, Dr Mario Holzner, Dr Sanja Vico | What are the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Western Balkans? What economic, social and democracy issues have arisen from the pandemic? What are the challenges that lie ahead? The panel will explore how the countries of the region have been tackling this crisis and how they have responded to the challenges in terms of internal policies and their relations with other countries, particularly the EU. Arjan Gjonça is an Associate Professor of Demography at the Department of International Development. He holds an MSc and a PhD in Demography from LSE and continues to work at LSE as a full member of academic staff. His teaching focuses on demographic methods and on global population health. Arjan started his career as an assistant professor at University of Tirana, Faculty of Economics, Albania. Mario Holzner (@MarioHolzner) is Executive Director at wiiw. He is also coordinating economic policy development and communication with a focus on European economic policy. He has recently worked on issues of infrastructure investment in greater Europe, proposing a European Silk Road. Mario Holzner is also a lecturer in applied econometrics at the University of Vienna, Department of Economics. He obtained his PhD in economics at the Vienna University of Economics and Business in 2005. Sanja Vico (@sanja_vico) is a Research Officer at European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and an Associate of the LSEE – South Eastern Europe Research Unit at the LSE. She holds an ERC-funded Postdoctoral Research position in Political Science at the LSE on the project Justice Interactions and Peacebuilding. She received her PhD in Media and Communications from Goldsmiths, University of London in 2019, an MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BSc from the Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Belgrade. Prior to joining the LSE European Institute, she worked as an Associate Lecturer at the Department of Media, Communications and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Studies of Global Media and Democracy at Goldsmiths. She also worked as a Research Consultant and Analyst on various projects related to media and politics in the Western Balkans, including at BBC Media Action which led to the launch of BBC New service in Belgrade in 2018. Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in three areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He has significant policy engagement on all three areas, including appointments in Experts Committees (e.g., on Regional Incentives policy and on Minimum Wage policy in Greece) and work with international bodies such as the European Commission (DG Regio, DG EMPL, DG EAC), the CEFTA Secretariat and the EBRD. He has published widely in economics and regional science journals, including Oxford Economic Papers, the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of Regional Science, Regional Studies, Urban Studies, and others; while he has co-authored a number of policy reports and edited books. He is Director of the LSE Research Unit on South Eastern Europe and holds affiliations with LSE’s Department of Geography and Environment and the Hellenic Observatory. He is Co-Editor of Spatial Economic Analysis, Committee Member of the British and Irish Section of the Regional Science Association, and member in various professional bodies.

  • Speaker(s): Sir Suma Chakrabarti, Amina J. Mohammed | The Addis Agenda that provided a new global framework for financing sustainable development and a process to deliver our 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is now five years old. The world was off track to deliver the SDGs before the COVID-19 crisis but the savage economic impact of coronavirus has set those long-term objectives back further. The SDGs are more important than ever - how do we re-inject momentum into the Addis Agenda and create a sustainable and resilient world? Join us for a conversation with EBRD President Sir Suma Chakrabarti and UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed, hosted by LSE Director Minouche Shafik. Suma Chakrabarti (@ebrdsuma) is the sixth President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). Sir Suma has served two terms as President, having been elected to the posts by the EBRD’s Board of Governors in 2012 and again in 2016. Before becoming President of the EBRD, Sir Suma had a career in the United Kingdom civil service and was Permanent Secretary at the Department for International Development (2002-2007) and the Ministry of Justice (2007-2012). Sir Suma’s earlier career was in international development, starting as a ODI Fellow in Botswana in the early 1980s, and encompassing a range of economic and administrative posts in the Overseas Development Administration (DFID’s predecessor) in London and in the UK office at the World Bank and IMF. Amina J. Mohammed (@AminaJMohammed) is the Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations and Chair of the United Nations Sustainable Development Group. Prior to her appointment, Ms. Mohammed served as Minister of Environment of the Federal Republic of Nigeria where she steered the country’s efforts on climate action and efforts to protect the natural environment. Ms. Mohammed first joined the United Nations in 2012 as Special Adviser to former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon with the responsibility for post-2015 development planning. She led the process that resulted in global agreement around the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the creation of the Sustainable Development Goals. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Speaker(s): Michelle Bachelet, Helen Clark, Matteo Renzi, Kevin Rudd, Minouche Shafik | Listen to this discussion on life after COVID-19 with the former leaders of Australia, Chile, Italy and New Zealand. Michelle Bachelet (@mbachelet) is the current United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Ms Bachelet was elected President of Chile on two occasions (2006–2010 and 2014–2018). She was the first female president of Chile. She also served as Health Minister (2000-2002) as well as Chile’s and Latin America’s first female Defence Minister (2002–2004). Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. Matteo Renzi (@matteorenzi) has been the Senator of the electoral college of Florence since 2018. In his political experience he has served as Prime Minister of Italy from February 2014 to December 2016 and as Mayor of Florence from June 2009 to February 2014. Kevin Rudd (@MrKRudd) served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister (2007-2010, 2013) and as Foreign Minister (2010-2012). He led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis—the only major developed economy not to go into recession—and helped found the G20. Mr. Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York as its inaugural President in January 2015. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Speaker(s): Professor Azza M. Karam, Elizabeth Oldfield, Dr James Walters | Faith communities have been prominent in public discourse since the beginning of the pandemic. Religious gatherings have been identified as a major sites of transmission raising tensions in many countries between believers and the secular authorities seeking to regulate them. But many people are also searching for meaning and faith groups have adapted to online worship and support to meet the need for hope and connection in the face of suffering and isolation. The pandemic seems to be fanning the flames of some existing religious tensions. But there are also new opportunities for a positive role for faith in the public sphere. How will COVID-19 reshape the religious landscape in the future? Azza M. Karam (@Mansoura1968) is Secretary General of Religions for Peace International; Professor of religion and development at the Vrije Universiteit, and lead facilitator for the United Nations’ Strategic Learning Exchanges on Religion, Development and Diplomacy. Former senior advisor on culture at the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA); coordinator/chair of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Religion and Development; senior policy research advisor at the United Nations Development Program in the Regional Bureau for Arab States; and president of the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations. Elizabeth Oldfield is Director of Theos. She appears regularly in the media, including BBC One, Sky News, the World Service, and writing in The Financial Times. She is a regular conference speaker and chair. Before joining Theos in August 2011, Elizabeth worked for BBC TV and radio. She has an MA in Theology from King’s College London James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and its Religion and Global Society Research Unit. He leads the team in the centre’s mission to promote religious literacy and interfaith leadership through student programmes and global engagement, along with research into the role of religion in world affairs. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice in the Department of International Relations and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. Katerina Dalacoura is Associate Professor in International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2015-16, she was British Academy Mid-Career Fellow and in 2016-19 she participated in a project on the ‘Middle East and North Africa Regional Architecture’, sponsored by the European Commission under the auspices of Horizon 2020 (2016-19).

  • Speaker(s):
    Dr Guy Aitchison, Dr Luke Cooper, Dr Nadine El-Enany, Professor Shalini Randeria | Over the last decade political authoritarianism has been on the rise across the globe. The ‘authoritarian wave’ has touched most continents and regions. So even before the crisis unleashed by Coronavirus many peoples across the world were resisting rising authoritarianism, nationalism and racism. Coronavirus has often been talked of as a historical rupture, igniting system change. ‘We will not go back’ to the pre-crisis world is the clarion call of the current moment. Yet, the nature of the new world being born is still far from certain. And while opportunities for progressive political change undoubtedly exist, this new historical conjuncture provides considerable opportunities for the further embedding of authoritarianism and new attacks on democracy. Warning of these dangers a new report, Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism, co-authored by Dr Guy Aitchison and Dr Luke Cooper, surveys the rise of anti-democratic forces and assesses their reaction to these extraordinary recent developments. Moving between the global picture and British domestic politics, the report argues that a new state-dependent capitalism is coalescing in response to the crisis and it ‘fits’ all too organically with the agenda of the authoritarian populists. Guy Aitchison (@GuyAitchison) is Lecturer in Politics and International Studies at Loughborough University and a co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Luke Cooper (@lukecooper100) is a consultant researcher in the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit and co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Nadine El-Enany (@NadineElEnany) is Senior Lecturer in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Race and Law at Birkbeck Law School. She is author of (B)ordering Britain: law, race and empire. Shalini Randeria (@IWM_Vienna) is the Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. Mary Kaldor (@KaldorM) is the Director of the LSE Conflict and Civil Society Research unit. Her most recent book is Global Security Cultures. Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit (@LSE_CCS) - Understanding conflict and violence in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Bridging the gap between citizens and policymakers. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Speaker(s): Helen Clark, Helena Puig Larrauri, Dr Mareike Schomerus | What are the consequences of the pandemic for countries affected by conflict and fragility? Will coronavirus contribute to the further escalation or new outbreaks of conflict? How can the international community –governments, international organisations, regional actors and civil society develop a peace-building response to COVID-19? Helen Clark, head of the United Nations Development Programme 2009-2017, and former Prime Minister of New Zealand leads an expert panel to discuss the development and security risks of the current pandemic. Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. She was also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the Heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. In 2019 Helen Clark became patron of The Helen Clark Foundation. She is an active member of many global organisations. Helena Puig Larrauri (@HelenaPuigL) is a Co-founder and Director of Build Up, a non-profit that works to identify and apply innovative practices to prevent conflict and tackle polarization. She is a governance and peacebuilding professional with over a decade of experience advising and supporting UN agencies, multi-lateral organisations and NGOs working in conflict contexts and polarized environments. She specializes in the integration of digital technology and innovation processes to peace processes, and has written extensively on this subject matter. She is also an Ashoka Fellow. Helena holds a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University and a Masters in Public Policy (Economics) from Princeton University. Mareike Schomerus is Vice President of the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Nairobi. Prior to that she was the Director of Programme Politics and Governance and the Research Director of the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) at odi in London. She is a widely published researcher with a body of work on violent conflict, political contestation and peace processes in South Sudan and Uganda and across borders, as well as behavioural insights in post-conflict recovery. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science and Master’s Degrees from Columbia University and the University of Bremen. Mary Martin is Director of the UN Business and Human Security Initiative at LSE IDEAS. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response.