Avsnitt

  • Ginger Hardage: Unstoppable Cultures
    Ginger Hardage is the former senior vice president of culture at Southwest Airlines. She led a team responsible for building and sustaining the organization’s legendary culture and communications enterprise, resulting in 23 consecutive years on Fortune’s list of Top 10 Most Admired Companies in the World.

    Today, Ginger leads Unstoppable Cultures, a firm designed to help organizations create and sustain cultures of enduring greatness. She facilitates the annual Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship to help leaders of all kinds take practical steps to create the culture that will help their organization thrive.

    In this conversation, Ginger and I discuss the five lies she’s seen come up again and again in her work with leaders who are struggling with culture. Perhaps most importantly, Ginger emphasizes that leaders need not accept the default culture, but should work to define the culture.
    Key Points
    The five lies Ginger has uncovered about culture:

    Culture is someone else’s job.
    Our values are on the wall.
    Culture is fluffy.
    If I empower my employees, I might lose control.
    We can’t afford culture.

    Bonus Audio

    Defining a culture

    Resources Mentioned

    5 Lies About Corporate Culture document
    Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship

    Related Episodes

    The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148)
    Notice and Change Dysfunctional Culture, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 327)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Leonardo Baumworcel: Hospital São Lucas
    Leonardo Baumworcel is the director of Hospital São Lucas in Brazil. He oversees a 200-bed hospital and emergency room seeing 10,000 patients a month. He also oversees the work of 2,500 staff. He is a cardiologist by training and a recent alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.
    Key Points

    One way to utilize the podcast is to leverage if for staff training to get the entire team on the same page.
    Resilience is key when working to achieve your vision through change — beware of giving up too quickly.
    Leaders need to establish the frameworks and limitations for what to do — and then help people to have the freedom to work within it.
    Peer mentoring allows both leaders to learn from each other, instead of limiting the professional development to one person.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leading Change* by John Kotter
    Our Iceberg Is Melting* by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber

    Related Episodes

    The Power of Vulnerability in Leadership, with Jason Brooks (episode 385)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)
    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    Move From Theory to Practice, with Steve Schroeder (episode 369)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Saknas det avsnitt?

    Klicka här för att uppdatera flödet manuellt.

  • Scott Anthony Barlow: Happen to Your Career
    Scott Anthony Barlow is the founder of Happen to Your Career. He’s been featured on CNBC, Yahoo, CareerBuilder, Fast Company, and Huffington Post and various colleges and universities as a top expert on career happiness. He's held executive roles in human resources, business development, and career coaching.

    Scott is the host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, featuring the career stories of many successful professionals. He and his team have worked with over 25,000 people to help them stop settling, find their signature strengths, and start doing meaningful work they are enamored with.
    Key Points

    Many people frame career choices only as, “Should I take this offer or not?” or, “Should I quit this job and go and get another?”
    Skills are not necessarily strengths. People who are successful and happier are spending more time in their strengths.
    Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment (now called CliftonStrengths) is a useful tool for getting clarity.
    Change to a role/company that allows you spend more time in your strengths or decide to design your career from the inside.
    Stop pursuing marginal improvements of your weaknesses.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired*
    8-Day Video Course to Figuring Out What You Love

    Related Episodes

    How to Figure Out Your Career, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 259)
    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    Move From Caretaker to Rainmaker, with May Busch (episode 390)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly-traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Samantha asks about how to confront an employee who is not willing to take direction for her.
    Cathy is wondering how she can lead on a team where she does not have formal authority.
    Amir is seeking advice on how to step into a director role with confidence and managing former peers.
    Kelly asks about responding to stakeholders who give suggestions when it doesn’t align with organizational strategy.

    Resources Mentioned

    Let's Get Real or Let's Not Play* by Mahan Khalsa, Randy Illig, and Stephen R. Covey
    Working Wardrobes*

    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257)
    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349)
    Finding Joy Though Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Sandie Morgan: Global Center for Women & Justice
    Sandie Morgan is the director of the Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University of Southern California. She is recognized globally for her expertise on combatting human trafficking and working to end violence against women. Sandie is professor, researcher, and partner to many organizations and agencies across the globe including governments, law enforcement, and non-profits.

    Since 2011, she has hosted along with me the bimonthly Ending Human Trafficking podcast which was recognized by The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth at the Department of Health and Human Services as a great way to “get up to speed on human trafficking.”
    Key Points

    Culture often changes from the top down. Engage “elites” who are outside of the centermost position of prestige.
    Find avenue of agreement instead of focusing on differences.
    Influence happens in exciting ways when the networks of elites and the institutions they lead overlap.
    Change will mean conflict — don’t be scared of this.
    The more diverse your partnerships are, the stronger your net is going to be.

    Bonus Audio

    Why learning from elites is so important

    Resources Mentioned

    To Change the World* by James Davison Hunter
    How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie
    Global Center for Women and Justice
    2019 Trafficking in Persons Report

    Related Episodes

    How Storytelling Helps You Lead, with Sandie Morgan (episode 51)
    How to Collaborate Across Organizations, with Kirsten Foot (episode 215)
    How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279)
    The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Pooja Agarwal: Powerful Teaching
    Pooja Agarwal is an expert in the field of cognitive science and is passionate about bridging gaps between education and the science of learning. She is the founder of RetrievalPractice.org and Assistant Professor at the Berklee College of Music, teaching psychological science to exceptional undergraduate musicians.

    She also serves as a consultant and facilitates professional development workshops on the science of learning around the world. Pooja is the author with Patrice Bain of the book Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning*.

    In this conversation, Pooja and I discuss the key strategies that leaders can use in order to maximize their effectiveness as teachers. Since almost every leader is responsible for talent development in some capacity, becoming a more powerful teacher will help you develop others more successfully.
    Key Points

    The three stages of the learning process are encoding, storage, and retrieval. We tend to focus too much on getting information into peoples’ heads (encoding) and not enough on getting it out (retrieval).
    Stop reviewing past discussions and meetings. Instead, invite people to recall and articulate prior interactions.
    Cramming works, but only in the short-term. For long-term retention, spacing is much more effective.
    There is no significant evidence that visual, auditory, and kinetic preferences correlate to actual learning. Instead, effective learning combines all these methods.

    Bonus Audio

    Why struggling is a good thing for learning

    Resources Mentioned

    RetrievalPractice.org
    PowerfulTeaching.org
    Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning*
    Are You a Visual or an Auditory Learner? It Doesn’t Matter

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Powerful Teaching in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Best Way to Do On-the-Job Training (episode 32)
    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Johanna Nalau: Climate Adaptation & Everyday Leadership
    Johanna Nalau is an adaptation scientist researching the ins and outs of climate change adaptation. She is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow and the Adaptation Science Theme Leader at Cities Research Institute at Griffith University.

    She’s also the lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 6th Assessment Report, Working Group II. Johanna writes about climate adaptation and everyday leadership on her own blog and is an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.

    In this conversation, Johanna and I discuss how she found her voice as a developing leader and how she took action through her writing and other professional activities to help others.
    Key Points

    Never underestimate the importance of having a group you can just bounce ideas off of.
    The most transformative way to build leadership is to start with the people below you who are the future leaders.
    Blogging is a great way to synthesize you thoughts while also being helpful for others.

    Resources Mentioned

    Johanna’s blog: Climate Adaptation & Everyday Leadership
    Stand Out* by Dorie Clark
    Great at Work* Morton Hansen
    Digital Minimalism* by Cal Newport

    Related Episodes

    How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285)
    Ideas Worth Stealing From Top Entrepreneurs, with Dorie Clark (episode 318)
    Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337)
    How to Reclaim Conversation, with Cal Newport (episode 400)
    The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Stacey Barr: Practical Performance Measurement
    Stacey Barr is a specialist in strategic performance measurement and evidence-based leadership. She is the creator of PuMP®, a performance measurement methodology that routinely transforms measurement cynics into its greatest advocates.

    Stacey is also the author of two books, Practical Performance Measurement: Using the PuMP® Blueprint for Fast, Easy, and Engaging KPIs*, and Prove It!: How to Create a High Performance Culture and Measurable Success*.

    In this conversation, Stacey and I discussed some of the common mistakes that leaders and organizations make with performance measurement. We also explore what well-formulated performance measures have. Plus, Stacey has kindly made her book available for free to our listening audience.
    Key Points
    Common mistakes in performance measurement:

    Initiatives are not performance measures
    Events or milestones are not performance measures
    Measures of activity completion are not performance measures
    Sources of data are not performance measures
    A few vague words don’t make a performance measure

    Well-formulated performance measures have:

    A method of comparison that we can use to tell whether performance is good or not
    A base of objective evidence that gives a reasonably accurate and reliable picture of current performance
    A sufficient degree of granularity to detect small but important changes in performance to which we should respond
    Relevance to the organization’s priorities
    The ability to show changes in performance levels over time, giving us enough context to avoid short-sightedness

    Resources Mentioned

    Download a free copy of Stacey’s book, Practical Performance Measurement
    The PuMP® Approach to Performance Measurement and KPIs

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Practical Performance Measurement in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    How to Leverage People Analytics, with Jenny Dearborn (episode 323)
    The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 361)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Safi Bahcall: Loonshots
    Safi Bahcall is a second-generation physicist and a biotech entrepreneur. He co-founded a biotechnology company developing new drugs for cancer, leading its IPO and serving as its CEO for 13 years.

    He worked with President Obama’s council of science advisors on the future of national research. Safi is the author of the book Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries*.

    In this conversation, Safi and I discuss how leaders can work intentionally to nurture new ideas through three key practices. If you are an innovator (or leading an innovation team) and hearing the voices of the naysayers, this framework will help you begin nurturing new ideas more successfully.
    Key Points

    A loonshot is a neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged.
    The ice cube is an analogy for the soldiers and artists in the organization. This is called phase separation.
    The most effective leaders view their work as gardeners, gently cultivating news ideas and investigating with genuine curiosity.
    Leaders who have a heart for both their soldiers and their artists will support a dynamic equilibrium in their organizations.
    Most innovation fails in the transfer between the artists and the soldiers.
    Steve Jobs is an example of a leader who, for many years, refused to show heart — but discovered it later with fantastic success.

    Resources Mentioned

    Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries* by Safi Bahcall

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Loonshots in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148)
    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    Get Better at Deep Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 408)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Key Points

    Don’t spend time feeling guilty about things you have to cut.
    Focus on quality over quantity.
    Your priorities will change over time.
    Sometimes even good things can crowd out what is really important.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Checklist Manifesto* by Atul Gawande
    Getting Things Done* by David Allen
    TripIt
    PackPoint
    Ending Human Trafficking podcast

    Related Episodes

    How Storytelling Helps You Lead, with Sandie Morgan (episode 51)
    Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184)
    How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310)
    How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Kwame Christian: American Negotiation Institute
    Kwame Christian is a business lawyer and the Director of the American Negotiation Institute. His TEDx Talk, Finding Confidence in Conflict, was the most popular TED Talk on the topic of conflict of 2017.

    Today, he’s working extensively with procurement departments within companies to help them make better deals. Kwame hosts the top negotiation podcast, Negotiate Anything and is the author of the book Nobody Will Play With Me: How to Find Confidence in Conflict*.

    In this conversation, Kwame and I discuss walking into a negotiation situation when someone else has more leverage, power, or authority. Yes, there are still many things you can do to influence a positive outcome for both parties — and we detail several practical actions almost anybody can take.
    Key Points

    Preparation before entering into negotiation is essential. Research supports that you will do better, even if the tables are tilted to one side.
    Finding what is publicly available about the other party before you go into a conversation can be very useful to both parties.
    Our tendency is to give things away before we are even certain the other party wants them.
    Your self-awareness and emotional state are key to acknowledge going into negotiation. Beware feeling too positive about the potential outcome.

    Resources Mentioned

    Kwame’s Ultimate Negotiation Guide
    Negotiate Anything podcast
    Nobody Will Play With Me: How To Use Compassionate Curiosity to Find Confidence in Conflict* by Kwame Christian
    Thinking Fast and Slow* by Daniel Kahneman

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Nobody Will Play With Me in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It, with Chris Voss (episode 262)
    Negotiation Tactics for Results, with Kwame Christian (episode 311)
    Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman (episode 353)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Chris Deferio: Keys to the Shop
    Chris Deferio is a cafe quality specialist who has dedicated 20 years of his life to working in and studying specialty coffee retail. He is also the creator and host of the industry leading podcast, Keys to the Shop, which gives listeners insights, inspiration, and tools to grow as specialty coffee professionals.

    Chris previously appeared on the show to help us get more perspective on managing part-time staff. In this conversation, Chris and I explore some of the practical steps that small business owners and general managers can take in order to support employee retention.
    Key Points

    Be mindful of the realities of turnover in a small business, but don’t let it stop you from thinking about the future and investing in people.
    Yes, hire for attitude — and also have an eye to future potential as the business grows.
    Ask people this question in interviews: “Where did you contribute to dysfunction in your prior organization?”
    Make an investment in people beyond the paycheck. This could be learning, culture, competitions, or more. There are ways to do this without tremendous expense.
    Practice intentional breaks in your rhythm, since nobody else in your business is likely to do this.

    Resources Mentioned

    Keys to the Shop podcast
    Good to Great* by Jim Collins
    Good Authority* by Jonathan Raymond
    Chris Deferio’s consulting

    Related Episodes

    Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107)
    How to Lead Part-Time Staff, with Chris Deferio (episode 289)
    Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337)
    How to Connect Personal Growth to Business Outcomes, with Jonathon Raymond (episode 373)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Bar Schwartz: Bring Your People Along
    Bar Schwartz is a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. She’s a software engineer by training and today a consultant and coach who lives and works in Berlin. Bar helps leaders to look differently on how they lead people to create meaningful work — and building structures that put people first.

    When Bar joined the Academy last year, she quickly set a goal to capture a few ideas in writing. This goal led to her writing a book in just a few short weeks. More importantly, she discovered the power of consistent movement in creating future opportunities.

    Bar has graciously made her book, Bring Your People Along, available as a free download for our listening community. If you decide to download the book, please reach out and let her know what was helpful to you.
    Key Points

    Your team will be more productive if it feels connected.
    It’s not hard to find questions if you listen.
    Small, manageable steps are more likely to lead to long-term success.

    Bonus Audio

    How to work in your strengths

    Resources Mentioned

    Bar Schwartz on LinkedIn
    Bring Your People Along by Bar Schwartz
    Happen to Your Career podcast by Scott Anthony Barlow (bonus audio)

    Related Episodes

    How to Know When to Move On

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Hassan Osman: Effective Delegation of Authority
    Hassan is a project management office leader at Cisco, where he leads a team of over 150 project and program managers on delivering complex projects across the world. He’s also served as a management consultant at Ernst & Young (now EY), where he led projects and programs for the largest enterprises.

    He’s the author of Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process. In this episode, Hassan and I discuss the three stages of delegation, the critical importance of planning, and how to leverage delegation as a development opportunity.

    Also impressive is the ten books Hassan has published while working full-time as a manager at a Fortune 100 company. He teaches others how to do it on his Writer on the Side podcast.
    Key Points

    Before you begin the delegation process, decide on the outcomes you need and the right person to get you there.
    Set expectations for goals, not actions.
    Use checkpoints to ensure progress and adjust frequency for experience and visibility.
    Summarize delegation meetings in writing after they occur.
    The real work of managers is to define the work, before it starts.

    Resources Mentioned

    Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman
    Writer on the Side podcast

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Effective Delegation of Authority in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Start Influencing Virtual Teams, with Hassan Osman (episode 234)
    The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284)
    Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Elizabeth asked about a tricky issue with an underperforming team member she inherited.
    Gordon wondered what he could do to support resilience during a time of massive change.
    Leona asked how she might think about the disconnect from what her organization espouses and what she sees in practice.
    Anthony was curious about when it’s appropriate to ask “why” and when it’s not.

    Resources Mentioned

    Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It … and Why the Rest Don’t* by Verne Harnish
    Scaling Up Growth Tools
    Analyzing Performance Problems* by Robert F. Mager and Peter Pipe

    Related Episodes

    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    How to Clarify What’s Important, with Ron Williams (episode 410)

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Dave Stachowiak: Coaching for Leaders
    I am often asked about the tools and technology behind our work. As we’ve updated our systems over the past year, I’ve identified seven tools that may also be helpful for you in creating more margin.

    Used thoughtfully, tools like these help us automate the things we can automate so we can spend more time doing the things we should never automate. Here are seven that may help:
    Technology Tools to Create Margin
    Acuity Scheduling* powers our all our calendars and serves as a 24/7 scheduling assistant. Automated reminders, time zone adjustments, rescheduling, and video meeting integration happen seamlessly.

    TextExpander* saves us tons of time each day to quickly populate documents, emails, forms, and other repeatable typing so we can respond to others faster and with more accuracy. The link above will provide you a 20% discount.

    1Password* helps us create unique and strong password for every account. Plus, there families and teams programs allow us to share passwords with others who need access.

    Pipedrive* is the customer relationship management system that’s just right for us. Powerful enough to visually help us to track every business conversation, but simple enough to be affordable and practical. The link above will provide access for a free trial.

    ConvertKit* gives our listeners a lot more choices on the kind of emails they receive. Plus, it provides its own automation to help your organization build its brand. This link above will provide access for a free trial.

    SaneBox* automatically filters our email so we can prioritize what’s most important. Plus, tons of other reminder tools come along with it. The link above will save you $15 if you decide to try it out.

    WP Engine* is the leader in WordPress managed hosting and now powers all of our sites. This link above will save you 10% hosting or three months free over a year.
    New Podcast: Dave’s Journal
    I announced a project titled Dave’s Journal. It’s a new podcast airing episodes of five minutes or less. The goal of each entry is to capture a valuable insight or reflection for leaders.

    Subscribe to Dave’s Journal on your favorite platform:

    Apple Podcasts
    Google Podcasts
    Overcast
    Stitcher

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Ron Williams: Learning to Lead
    Ron Williams is a veteran business leader, turn-around expert, and advocate for value creation. Today he is chairman and CEO of RW2 Enterprises and also a member of the board of directors for American Express, The Boeing Company, and Johnson & Johnson.

    Ron is the former chairman and CEO of health insurance giant Aetna. When he joined Aetna in 2001, its loss from continuing operations was $292 million, with earnings per share at a loss of $0.46. In 2011, the year he stepped down as Chairman, Aetna’s full-year operating earnings were $2 billion, with operating earnings per share of $5.17.

    In this conversation, Ron shares wisdom from his book, Learning to Lead: The Journey to Leading Yourself, Leading Others, and Leading an Organization*. Ron discusses his own leadership journey and how he asked the right questions to inspire a successful turn-around at Aetna. He also shares the reason for avoiding “why” questions and the value that knowledge maps provided at Aetna.
    Key Points
    Ron’s five kinds of questions that help challenge your organization’s reality:

    Highlight key problems
    Clarify the facts
    Probe an underlying story
    Suggest alternatives
    Drill down to basics

    In addition, Ron suggested:

    Ask questions that start with “what” instead of “why.”
    Utilize knowledge maps to support business literacy for complex issues.
    Make yourself better every year by aiming for 15% improvement.

    Resources Mentioned

    Learning to Lead: The Journey to Leading Yourself, Leading Others, and Leading an Organization* by Ron Williams

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Learning to Lead in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Grow Your Leadership Career, with Ron Wallace
    Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Jim Harter: It’s the Manager
    Jim Harter is the Chief Scientist for Workplace at Gallup. He has led more than 1,000 studies of workplace effectiveness, including the largest ongoing meta-analysis of human potential and business unit performance. He is the co-author with Jim Clifton of the new book, It’s the Manager: Gallup Finds That the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization’s Long-Term Success*.
    Key Points
    Millennials and Generation Z have influenced the changing nature of work. Six key findings from Gallup:

    People don’t just work for a paycheck — they want a purpose.
    People are no longer pursuing job satisfaction — they are pursuing development.
    People don’t want bosses — they want coaches.
    People don’t want annual reviews — they want ongoing conversations.
    People don’t want a manager that fixates on their weaknesses.
    People say, it’s not my job — it’s my life.

    Resources Mentioned

    It's the Manager: Gallup Finds the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization's Long-Term Success* by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter
    CliftonStrengths (formerly StrengthsFinder) assessment
    Gallup Access

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from It’s the Manager in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier
    Leverage StrengthsFinder / CliftonStrengths, with Lisa Cummings
    Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Oscar Trimboli: Deep Listening
    Oscar is a mentor, coach, speaker, and author. He was a director at Microsoft for over a decade and headed up the MS Office division in Australia. Today, he works with leadership teams and their organizations on the importance of clarity to create change, how to embrace the digital economy, and the role values play in the achievement of your purpose. He is the author of Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words*.
    Key Points

    Listen beyond the words that are said and try to determine what the speaker is really trying to say.
    The more senior you are, the more listening you’ll do.
    Ask the speaker: “Tell me more” or “What else are you thinking?” or “How long have you been thinking about that?”
    To be a great listener, you have to create a space where you’re available to listen.
    For every hour you listen, you need to spend another hour in action.
    Leaders often are not great at hearing all the opinions in the room.

    Bonus Audio

    Three tips to becoming a better listener

    Resources Mentioned

    The 5 Myths of Listening
    Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words* by Oscar Trimboli

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Deep Listening in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant
    How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser
    How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is Dave’s life partner and best friend, business professor, past executive leader, and the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.
    Listener Questions

    Brad asked about supporting a team member who’s being taken advantage of by someone else in the organization.
    Mark is wondering about how to help an existing team move on to being a high-performing team.
    Ashish asked about how to determine more in the interviewing process.
    Craig wanted perspective on how to be more visible.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block
    Essentialism* by Greg Mckeown

    Related Episodes

    How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet
    How to Work With an Executive Recruiter, with Becky deSouza

    Discover More
    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.