Avsnitt

  • Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.alfa.com/en/chemistry-podcasts/ to access our episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest.

    There are exciting stories of life-changing experiences thanks to science, or through science. And then there is Osvaldo’s story. Osvaldo Gutierrez, now assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at University of Maryland, could not really foresee his future as an award-winning chemist when, as a child, he left Mexico to move to the United States.

    This episode tells an inspiring story of personal development through hard work, perseverance and talent – a real and modern American dream. But it’s not just a tale of a kid from humble origins becoming an accomplished chemist and a role model for the younger generations, this is also a story of scientific excellence. Paolo and Osvaldo discuss the present and future of catalysis, how base metals such as iron could displace precious metals but also offer novel options for synthetic organic chemists and how combining computational and experimental chemistry is a promising way to gain the fundamental understanding necessary to introduce some much-needed innovations in modern organic synthesis.

  • For decades the pharmaceutical industry has synthesized millions of molecular entities in the pursuit of novel biological activities. These huge compound libraries have always been considered a treasure trove of potential new drugs for a plethora of new therapeutic targets. With the huge progress in laboratory automation and high-throughput technology over the last decade, library screening remains a key drug discovery strategy. The size of these libraries and their handling present however multiple challenges, starting from the synthesis and screening speed, storage space, and annotation required when working with Singleton compounds. A clever alternative finds inspiration from biology and leverages the DNA information storage power. This is known as DNA Encoded Libraries, or DELs. Dr. Katelyn Billings is a pioneer of this technology that offers a number of advantages, starting from the possibility of working on the nanoscale in as little as a few microliters to make and screen millions of molecules as a pool. In this episode we learn about how DELs work and discuss their advantages, challenges and the promise of combining data from DEL screens with machine learning to disrupt modern drug discovery.

    Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.alfa.com/en/chemistry-podcasts/ to access our episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest.

  • Saknas det avsnitt?

    Klicka här för att uppdatera flödet manuellt.

  • Life is the result of an incredibly complex mix of chemical reactions, all happening at the same time, influencing each other. These apparently chaotic and incomprehensible systems are elegantly regulated at organ, tissue and even cellular and sub-cellular level. Most of these chemical phenomena are not fully understood and the scale and complexity of the micro-environment where they happen often prevent scientific observations without perturbing them. This is where out-of-the-box chemical thinking can make a difference, and this is what Dr. Peng Zou has dedicated his research efforts to. Smart use of chemical tags can allow us to literally visualize chemical phenomena inside the cell as they happen, using relatively straightforward technologies such as fluorescence microscopy. One reaction at a time, Peng’s team is developing detailed cellular maps and achieving significant advances in the comprehension of the cell’s chemical machinery. This episode is masterful example of how chemistry can advance biological knowledge.

    Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.alfa.com/en/chemistry-podcasts/ to access our episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest.

  • Theoretical chemistry is one of those subjects that can intimidate even the most passionate experimental chemist. Complex theories rooted in super-advanced mathematics to model a chemical bond length are not everyone’s cup of tea. Yet it does not have to be like that and it takes brilliant minds like Brenda Rubenstein’s to make it so elegantly obvious. Brenda and Paolo’s discussion is as approachable as it gets; a surprisingly eye-opening discovery of how theory can have profound effects on experimental practice. Brenda talks through her efforts in finding the right balance between molecular simulations’ theoretical rigor and their practical utility, and opening the door to her incredible creative thinking and courage in pursuing disruptive ideas. Her novel paradigm for the computer of the future, where chemistry is used to achieve massive increases in data storage density compared to traditional semiconductor technologies, represents truly out-of-the-box. As if all this wasn’t enough, we also find a brilliant example of social responsibility in Brenda’s commitment to change lives of children from low-income background through facilitating access to STEM education. An unmissable episode.

    Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.alfa.com/en/chemistry-podcasts/ to access our episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest.

  • Since the elucidation of the DNA structure by James Watson and Francis Crick in 1951, the importance of understanding the three-dimensional structure of biomolecules has become obvious. Over the last few decades scientists have resolved the structure of thousands of complex biomolecules enabling incredible innovations in drug design, biological and medical sciences. X-Ray crystallography has been the key technique, but in recent years Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has emerged as an additional, complementary approach. Dr. Loren Andreas explains to us how NMR has grown to be the technology of choice as it has expanded its field of application from liquid solutions to condensed systems. The discussion is a surprising discovery of how progress in engineering and instrument design has completely changed the landscape in structural biology. Modern NMR allows scientists to study molecules in complex systems, simulating more closely their natural environment, including interaction between them. This episode offers an exciting glimpse of the future, through a few examples from today’s science.

    Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.alfa.com/en/chemistry-podcasts/ to access our episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest.

  • 80% of waste water gets discharged untreated, which causes some of the most urgent environmental issues facing our planet. However, Dr. William Tarpeh, nominated as one of The Root 100's most influential African Americans, views waste water is an incredible resource that contains many valuable components and represents an untapped economic opportunity in our world of finite resources.

    This episode is an intriguing discovery of how chemical engineering can transform our energy-intense linear economy, where materials are made, used and eventually discarded, into a new circular economy based on recovery value and a vision of eliminating waste altogether.

    William and Paolo speak about how selective adsorbent resins and electrochemical processes can completely change the chemical landscape and profoundly impact the global economy. This episode is a treasure trove of examples of how chemical innovation can change the world and how great science can translate into practical applications with immediate tangible benefits for human life and the environment.

  • Common phenomena, observed by most in their daily experience, can be surprisingly misunderstood and even mysterious! Genuine curiosity, an open mind, and good dose of creativity are the necessary ingredients for the most exciting scientific discoveries. This is the take-home message of our fascinating discussion with Dr. Lauren Zarzar, who studies microscale systems and their macroscopic effects. We find out what is behind the iridescence at the air-water interface, how this can be reproduced and controlled with many different types of emulsions, and how it could be used in novel paints and display technologies. We also discuss 3D printing at the nanoscale using lasers and how this can revolutionize materials science. The work of Dr. Zarzar is yet another great demonstration of how great science happens at the interface between different disciplines, with chemistry usually being one of them.

  • If you thought chemistry is basically just boiling stinky mixtures in a flask, this is the episode for you. There is no better demonstration for how chemistry is foundational to practically all sciences and technologies. What Dr. Tina Li does at CMC Materials is finding new ways to ensure semiconductor layers in electronic components manufacturing are as smooth as possible, to allow the deposition of as many layers as possible on a single wafer. This is the key to enable increased complexity and computational power for all electronic devices.

    Dr. Li explains how this “sanding” at the nanoscale level works. Selective chemical reactions work in synergy with abrasion to achieve unbelievable levels of smoothness, measured in nanometers. We discuss the chemistry that helps enable our smartphones and computers, but also about a journey of professional and personal growth and what it means to do chemical research in an industrial environment.

  • If you thought a career in science means spending your best years in a dark laboratory for long, boring hours doing routine experiments, think again! Dr. Cora Young, from York University in Toronto, does a significant part of her environmental chemistry work in the field. From measuring air quality in residential and business spaces, to going high altitude on airplanes, or doing measurements in forests and even in the Arctic.

    In this episode, we discuss research in the growing field of environmental chemistry, how it differs from traditional analytical chemistry, and what it means bringing high precision analysis out of controlled laboratory environments. Dr. Young sheds light on how analyzing air quality can have a profound impact on international regulations and quality of life. From understanding emissions of worrisome pollutants such as polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), to how cooking at home can affect our health, this is a fascinating discovery of the chemistry of air.

  • Polymer chemistry has been one of the main disruptive forces in the last few decades, having a profound impact on materials used in all applications, enabling new technologies and profoundly impacting everyone’s life. Polymers are at the core of modern material science and despite having generated some concerning environmental challenges, it’s hard to imagine a future without them.

    Dr. Leibfarth is one of the most creative minds in polymer chemistry today and he is leading some incredible innovation in the way these materials are made and applied. He shares a fascinating story of elite collegiate American football, science, inspiration and creativity, as well as where different disciplines converge and provide the disruptive force to change paradigms.

    Paolo and Frank discuss stereo-controlled polymerization, novel functionalization, exploration of structure-function relationships, as well as Frank's personal and professional growth.

  • Human milk provides both nutritional and non-nutritional components tailored to the specific need of the infant at all phases of growth. It is a wonderful example of personalised medicine and diet and its complexity is only partially understood. The oligosaccharides contained in breastmilk have only recently emerged as potent pro- and anti-biotics and they are proven to have effects on several other physiological mechanisms and biological pathways, such as the immune system.

    We discuss with Dr. Townsend, a leading scientist in this field, about these special carbohydrates’ properties, about their chemistry and the challenges of running ambitious multidisciplinary research at the interface between chemistry and biology.

    Dr. Townsend takes us on a surprising journey of personal development and scientific progress that could lead to a revolution in nutrition, the design of novel antimicrobial and antifungal drugs and even re-think contraception.